Legislative Assembly of Alberta The 30th Legislature

Second Session Cooper, Hon. Nathan M., Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills (UC), Speaker

Pitt, Angela D., Airdrie-East (UC), Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees Milliken, Nicholas, Calgary-Currie (UC), Deputy Chair of Committees

Aheer, Leela Sharon, Chestermere-Strathmore (UC) Allard, Tracy L., Grande Prairie (UC) Amery, Mickey K., Calgary-Cross (UC) Armstrong-Homeniuk, Jackie,

Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville (UC) Barnes, Drew, Cypress-Medicine Hat (Ind) Bilous, Deron, Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview (NDP) Carson, Jonathon, Edmonton-West Henday (NDP) Ceci, Joe, Calgary-Buffalo (NDP) Copping, Hon. Jason C., Calgary-Varsity (UC) Dach, Lorne, Edmonton-McClung (NDP),

Official Opposition Deputy Whip Dang, Thomas, Edmonton-South (NDP),

Official Opposition Deputy House Leader Deol, Jasvir, Edmonton-Meadows (NDP) Dreeshen, Devin, Innisfail-Sylvan Lake (UC) Eggen, David, Edmonton-North West (NDP),

Official Opposition Whip Ellis, Hon. Mike, Calgary-West (UC) Feehan, Richard, Edmonton-Rutherford (NDP) Fir, Hon. Tanya, Calgary-Peigan (UC) Frey (formerly Glasgo), Michaela L., Brooks-Medicine Hat (UC) Ganley, Kathleen T., Calgary-Mountain View (NDP) Getson, Shane C., Lac Ste. Anne-Parkland (UC) Glubish, Hon. Nate, Strathcona-Sherwood Park (UC) Goehring, Nicole, Edmonton-Castle Downs (NDP) Gotfried, Richard, Calgary-Fish Creek (UC) Gray, Christina, Edmonton-Mill Woods (NDP),

Official Opposition House Leader Guthrie, Peter F., Airdrie-Cochrane (UC) Hanson, David B., Bonnyville-Cold Lake-St. Paul (UC) Hoffman, Sarah, Edmonton-Glenora (NDP) Horner, Hon. Nate S., Drumheller-Stettler (UC) Hunter, Grant R., Taber-Warner (UC) Irwin, Janis, Edmonton-Highlands-Norwood (NDP),

Official Opposition Deputy Whip Issik, Hon. Whitney, Calgary-Glenmore (UC),

Government Whip Jones, Matt, Calgary-South East (UC) Kenney, Hon. Jason, PC, Calgary-Lougheed (UC),

Premier LaGrange, Hon. Adriana, Red Deer-North (UC) Loewen, Todd, Central Peace-Notley (Ind) Long, Martin M., West Yellowhead (UC) Lovely, Jacqueline, Camrose (UC) Loyola, Rod, Edmonton-Ellerslie (NDP) Luan, Hon. Jason, Calgary-Foothills (UC) Madu, Hon. Kaycee, QC, Edmonton-South West (UC) McIver, Hon. Ric, Calgary-Hays (UC)

Nally, Hon. Dale, Morinville-St. Albert (UC) Neudorf, Nathan T., Lethbridge-East (UC) Nicolaides, Hon. Demetrios, Calgary-Bow (UC) Nielsen, Christian E., Edmonton-Decore (NDP) Nixon, Hon. Jason, Rimbey-Rocky Mountain House-Sundre (UC),

Government House Leader Nixon, Jeremy P., Calgary-Klein (UC) Notley, Rachel, Edmonton-Strathcona (NDP),

Leader of the Official Opposition Orr, Hon. Ronald, Lacombe-Ponoka (UC) Pancholi, Rakhi, Edmonton-Whitemud (NDP) Panda, Hon. Prasad, Calgary-Edgemont (UC) Phillips, Shannon, Lethbridge-West (NDP) Pon, Hon. Josephine, Calgary-Beddington (UC) Rehn, Pat, Lesser Slave Lake (UC) Reid, Roger W., Livingstone-Macleod (UC) Renaud, Marie F., St. Albert (NDP) Rosin, Miranda D., Banff-Kananaskis (UC) Rowswell, Garth, Vermilion-Lloydminster-Wainwright (UC) Rutherford, Brad, Leduc-Beaumont (UC),

Deputy Government Whip Sabir, Irfan, Calgary-McCall (NDP),

Official Opposition Deputy House Leader Savage, Hon. Sonya, Calgary-North West (UC) Sawhney, Hon. Rajan, Calgary-North East (UC) Schmidt, Marlin, Edmonton-Gold Bar (NDP) Schow, Joseph R., Cardston-Siksika (UC),

Deputy Government House Leader Schulz, Hon. Rebecca, Calgary-Shaw (UC) Schweitzer, Hon. Doug, QC, Calgary-Elbow (UC) Shandro, Hon. Tyler, QC, Calgary-Acadia (UC) Shepherd, David, Edmonton-City Centre (NDP) Sigurdson, Lori, Edmonton-Riverview (NDP) Sigurdson, R.J., Highwood (UC) Singh, Peter, Calgary-East (UC) Smith, Mark W., Drayton Valley-Devon (UC) Stephan, Jason, Red Deer-South (UC) Sweet, Heather, Edmonton-Manning (NDP) Toews, Hon. Travis, Grande Prairie-Wapiti (UC) Toor, Devinder, Calgary-Falconridge (UC) Turton, Searle, Spruce Grove-Stony Plain (UC) van Dijken, Glenn, Athabasca-Barrhead-Westlock (UC) Walker, Jordan, Sherwood Park (UC) Williams, Dan D.A., Peace River (UC) Wilson, Hon. Rick D., Maskwacis-Wetaskiwin (UC) Yao, Tany, Fort McMurray-Wood Buffalo (UC) Yaseen, Hon. Muhammad, Calgary-North (UC) Vacant, Fort McMurray-Lac La Biche

Party standings: United Conservative: 60 New Democrat: 24 Independent: 2 Vacant: 1

Officers and Officials of the Legislative Assembly

Shannon Dean, QC, Clerk Teri Cherkewich, Law Clerk Trafton Koenig, Senior Parliamentary

Counsel Philip Massolin, Clerk Assistant and

Director of House Services

Nancy Robert, Clerk of Journals and Committees

Janet Schwegel, Director of Parliamentary Programs

Amanda LeBlanc, Deputy Editor of Alberta Hansard

Chris Caughell, Sergeant-at-Arms Tom Bell, Deputy Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Link, Deputy Sergeant-at-Arms

Executive Council

Jason Kenney Premier, President of Executive Council, Minister of Intergovernmental Relations

Jason Copping Minister of Health

Mike Ellis Associate Minister of Mental Health and Addictions

Tanya Fir Associate Minister of Red Tape Reduction

Nate Glubish Minister of Service Alberta

Nate Horner Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Rural Economic Development

Whitney Issik Associate Minister of Status of Women

Adriana LaGrange Minister of Education

Jason Luan Minister of Community and Social Services

Kaycee Madu Minister of Justice and Solicitor General

Ric McIver Minister of Municipal Affairs

Dale Nally Associate Minister of Natural Gas and Electricity

Demetrios Nicolaides Minister of Advanced Education

Jason Nixon Minister of Environment and Parks

Ronald Orr Minister of Culture

Prasad Panda Minister of Infrastructure

Josephine Pon Minister of Seniors and Housing

Sonya Savage Minister of Energy

Rajan Sawhney Minister of Transportation

Rebecca Schulz Minister of Children’s Services

Doug Schweitzer Minister of Jobs, Economy and Innovation

Tyler Shandro Minister of Labour and Immigration

Travis Toews President of Treasury Board and Minister of Finance

Rick Wilson Minister of Indigenous Relations

Muhammad Yaseen Associate Minister of Immigration and Multiculturalism

Parliamentary Secretaries

Martin Long Parliamentary Secretary for Small Business and Tourism

STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ALBERTA

Standing Committee on the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund Chair: Mr. Rowswell Deputy Chair: Mr. Jones

Allard Eggen Gray Hunter Phillips Rehn Singh

Standing Committee on Alberta’s Economic Future Chair: Mr. Neudorf Deputy Chair: Ms Goehring

Armstrong-Homeniuk Barnes Bilous Frey (formerly Glasgo) Irwin Rosin Rowswell Sweet van Dijken Walker

Select Special Child and Youth Advocate Search Committee Chair: Mr. Schow Deputy Chair: Mr. Jones

Goehring Lovely Nixon, Jeremy Pancholi Sabir Smith Turton

Standing Committee on Families and Communities Chair: Ms Lovely Deputy Chair: Ms Sigurdson

Amery Carson Frey (formerly Glasgo) Gotfried Hunter Loewen Pancholi Reid Sabir Smith

Standing Committee on Legislative Offices Chair: Mr. Rutherford Deputy Chair: Mr. Milliken

Allard Ceci Long Loyola Rosin Shepherd Smith Sweet van Dijken

Special Standing Committee on Members’ Services Chair: Mr. Cooper Deputy Chair: Mr. Schow

Allard Dang Deol Goehring Long Neudorf Sabir Sigurdson, R.J. Williams

Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members’ Public Bills Chair: Mr. Rutherford Deputy Chair: Mr. Jeremy Nixon

Amery Dang Frey (formerly Glasgo) Irwin Long Nielsen Rehn Rosin Sigurdson, L.

Standing Committee on Privileges and Elections, Standing Orders and Printing Chair: Mr. Smith Deputy Chair: Mr. Reid

Aheer Armstrong-Homeniuk Deol Ganley Gotfried Loyola Neudorf Renaud Stephan Williams

Standing Committee on Public Accounts Chair: Ms Phillips Deputy Chair: Mr. Reid

Armstrong-Homeniuk Lovely Pancholi Renaud Rowswell Schmidt Singh Toor Turton Walker

Select Special Committee on Real Property Rights Chair: Mr. Sigurdson Deputy Chair: Mr. Rutherford

Frey (formerly Glasgo) Ganley Hanson Milliken Nielsen Rowswell Schmidt Sweet van Dijken Yao

Standing Committee on Resource Stewardship Chair: Mr. Hanson Deputy Chair: Member Ceci

Dach Feehan Ganley Getson Guthrie Lovely Rehn Singh Turton Yao

November 18, 2021 Alberta Hansard 6281

Legislative Assembly of Alberta Title: Thursday, November 18, 2021 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. Thursday, November 18, 2021

[The Speaker in the chair]

The Speaker: Hon. members, please remain standing for the playing of God Save the Queen.

Recording: God save our gracious Queen, Long live our noble Queen, God save the Queen! Send her victorious, Happy and glorious, Long to reign over us, God save the Queen!

The Speaker: Please be seated.

head: Members’ Statements United Conservative Party

Member Loyola: Today is a very infamous anniversary, Mr. Speaker. Two years ago today the UCP fired the Election Commissioner in the middle of his investigation into the UCP and members of their caucus for fraud, forgery, and bribery. Albertans were and still are shocked at the corrupt actions of a corrupt government that prioritizes covering up for their friends more than protecting our democratic institutions. Not that the UCP has ever had much respect for Alberta democracy. As we speak, the RCMP are actively investigating allegations of voter fraud in the UCP’s leadership race, which was won by this Premier. A quarter of the UCP cabinet was questioned in relation to this scandal. As sure as day follows night, the RCMP starts investigating the UCP, and the UCP decides that they should get rid of the RCMP. A member of the UCP is fined over $30,000 for breaking rules related to his nomination, and like clockwork here comes the Justice minister to remove rules around nominations. The Premier attacks doctors, nurses, teachers, Albertans with disabilities, and Albertans who care about the environment, but he gives full, one hundred per cent support to an MLA who had his business raided by the RCMP the day before the election. The Premier, who claimed to support decorum and respect but who set a fake campaign to attack his rivals in the leadership race. The Premier, who’s being accused by members of his caucus of using his office to have PACs pay for people to clap for him this weekend. But despite the best efforts of the UCP, democracy is still alive in Alberta. Albertans see the UCP for exactly who they are, and in two years this government will be held accountable. Happy anniversary, to those on that side of the House. I hope you have a really good day. The rest of Alberta, those not in your inner circle, will continue to suffer for the time being, but I have a feeling that come 2023, they will vote for a better way. They’ll vote for democracy.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Lac Ste. Anne-Parkland has the call.

Film and Television Industry

Mr. Getson: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Do you need a great place to film a movie? Who are you going to call? Ghostbusters: Afterlife was filmed right here in Alberta in the constituency of Livingstone-

Macleod, a region where my grandma came from and that many of my family members still call home today. Alberta is known as the strong and free province, with people who have true grit. We can now say, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that also we ain’t afraid of no ghosts. The new Ghostbusters recently wrapped up filming and had a premier debut last week. If you look closely in the film, you can see the historic Empress Theatre in Fort Macleod. Fans came from as far away as Utah, donning proton packs, to celebrate their favourite film franchise. This production, according to Sony Pictures and the Motion Picture Association of Canada, created 1,200 jobs across Alberta in places ranging from Fort Macleod, Drumheller, Horsethief, Turner Valley, Calgary, Beiseker, Crossfield, Dorothy, De Winton to Albertina Farms, also near Calgary. Ghostbusters: Afterlife is part of a huge surge in filming that’s happened throughout the province over the last year and a half since our government introduced the film and television tax credit. More than 50 productions have invested more than a billion dollars into the province, creating more than 9,200 jobs. The last studio I’ll mention, HBO, was filming the largest production in Canadian history right here in our own province, The Last of Us. My kids are also very excited about this one. The production has set up in the Fort Macleod area as well. Mr. Damian Petti, president of IATSE 212 in Alberta, said that its members’ total earnings are up 300 per cent over 2019, and he expects production numbers that are the same. He also credits our film and television tax credit for attracting further productions into the province. Mr. Speaker, Ghostbusters: Afterlife is in theatres today. I can’t wait to take my kids because we ain’t afraid of no ghosts.

Women’s Entrepreneurship Week

Mrs. Allard: The Associate Minister of Status of Women has officially declared November 19 to 26 Women’s Entrepreneurship Week in Alberta. During this week we celebrate women in business and their incredible accomplishments and contributions. Mr. Speaker, the rate of women entrepreneurs in Alberta is among the highest in Canada, and I am proud to be among those from the city of Grande Prairie. This fact is something for all Albertans to be very proud of. Alberta women have proven time and time again that they are strong leaders and trailblazers. They have made history and paved the way for others, and I, for one, am grateful for those that paved the way for me when I started out 28 years ago. I know. Hard to believe. During the most challenging times these trailblazers show their true grit and resilience as they adapt and pivot their businesses, innovate, and lead. That is the Alberta way, Mr. Speaker. Many women across this province put their heart into starting, growing, and maintaining their business, and they are key in Alberta’s recovery plan as they are often the backbone of our communities. They create jobs, put money back into the economy, and support local causes and charities. They also make many sacrifices. Running a business is not easy. It means long days and long nights, time away from family and friends, and certainly work on the weekends. They know that running your own business means the buck stops with you. We thank these women for their contributions in making Alberta the best place in the world to live and to work. We congratulate them on their successes, and in times of economic turmoil we share in their pain. Mr. Speaker, our government knows the value and importance of women entrepreneurs in Alberta. We know the economy and our communities are stronger when women are full participants in entrepreneurship. Truly, strong women means strong

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communities. I’m proud that our government continues to make strategic investments in women and all Albertans to ensure we are ready to seize opportunity and step into our bright future, writing the next great chapter in Alberta’s story. Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you to the incredible women across this province, including those in Grande Prairie, who continue to inspire, build, and make a real difference.

Homeless Supports and Affordable Housing

Ms Sigurdson: The UCP is taking a victory lap on their funding announcement for homeless supports. However, it is just a Band- Aid to a problem they have made worse. The challenges remain and have been exacerbated by the pandemic. Why did this government wait until November to address the issue they should have known was inevitable? Waiting until the snow falls to act is unacceptable. This summer they allowed four shelters to close on the south side of Edmonton without a plan to reopen them. This is a problem across the province. My colleague from St. Albert asked about the inhumane conditions Indigenous people in Wetaskiwin are experiencing. The Minister of Indigenous Relations and the MLA for this area had no adequate answers. All Albertans deserve to live in dignity and have a safe place to call home. The government needs to stop pushing people into poverty and start investing in affordable housing. The UCP claim they support housing, but their record shows a very different story. In their first budget the UCP made sweeping cuts to rental supplements, housing management bodies, and the Indigenous housing corporation. They also deindexed AISH and other income supports. Two years later the UCP wave off responsibility and act shocked that more people are experiencing homelessness. At the Alberta Municipalities conference this morning our leader received resounding applause when she committed to working with municipalities to build and expand affordable housing if elected. The UCP’s current plan to sell off affordable housing to the highest bidder is completely contrary to what municipalities want. I have not heard any mayor or councillor endorse this horrendous plan. Replacing affordable housing with shelter mats is hardly a reason to celebrate, yet this is exactly what the UCP are doing. The NDP caucus takes homelessness seriously. We’re working to not only reduce poverty but eliminate it entirely.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville is next.

1:40 Economic Recovery and Growth

Ms Armstrong-Homeniuk: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I’d like to draw the Assembly’s attention to what is an abundance of new opportunities which we have created for Albertans these past few months. We have seen some tough times, and the pandemic has hit everyone in different ways, but while we’ve been working around the clock to keep people safe, we’ve also been working hard bringing Albertans through these difficult times and onto the path of economic recovery. Firstly, our government announced a momentous agreement in child care. Mr. Speaker, our agreement to provide $10-a-day child care is unprecedented in Alberta. This plan will also include private operators. Our government knows that private operators make up the majority of child care in Alberta. Private businesses are the backbone of our communities. Another one of our new programs, Digital Main Street, will help Albertans build start-ups and grow their business online. We have

also partnered with the CIB, investing almost a billion dollars into jobs and development in the agricultural industry. Our policies like the red tape reduction strategy, the petrochemicals incentive program, the skills for jobs strategy, the natural gas strategy, flexibility for municipalities to offer property tax incentives, preapproved regulatory zones, and investments in carbon capture and storage infrastructure have all helped to make Alberta a magnet for investment. Our government’s energy strategy is unparalleled, attracting world-class businesses to Alberta, giving confidence in our province. Just last month Dow announced a multi-billion-dollar project to build the world’s first net zero carbon emissions ethylene and derivatives complex in my riding of Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville. Our government is investing in projects that will help Albertans get back to work and on the path to recovery as part of Alberta’s recovery plan. Mr. Speaker, these are good-news stories. Thanks to our government’s policy, Alberta is coming back stronger than ever.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Edmonton-Manning has the call.

Support for Agriculture

Ms Sweet: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The UCP needs to show leadership to support farmers through the tough challenges they face, including the implications of the drought and the current supply chain disruption. The UCP also needs to be forward-looking to support agriculture through a changing economy. I hope the new agriculture minister will be able to convince this UCP government to stop leaving farmers behind. This past season has been extremely difficult for farmers. The COVID-19 pandemic came with so much uncertainty and challenges to the supply chain, and challenges increased with this last year’s drought. I wrote to the previous minister when this hot and dry weather was forecasted in July asking for a clear, outlined plan to ensure that farmers were supported if a drought were to happen. My request was ignored, and the response from this government was late and inadequate. Many famers still have not received their insurance claims. Farmers are questioning if they can remain on the farm; getting adequate support from this government is paramount in ensuring that they can. The previous minister committed in this House that all claims will be settled by the end of this month. I hope the new minister is able to achieve that. Another uncertain challenge is looming with the floods in British Columbia and their impact on the supply chain. This can impact the ability of people to get food that they need. Unlike the UCP’s response to the drought, I sincerely hope they are working strategically to prepare a better plan for this situation. The UCP must become forward-looking. I know this government used to call diversification a luxury, but Alberta’s economy can grow as a result of investing in value-added agriculture and innovation. The supply chain disruption of the past two years has shown the advantages of having more processing done here at home. The UCP also needs to recognize the realities of climate change. The climate is changing, and so is the economy. The UCP has a duty to address climate change, to mitigate dry seasons like we’ve had from getting worse, and there is opportunity to work within agriculture to leverage potential in energy efficiency. Alberta farmers have been there for us, and now they deserve a government to be there for them.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Calgary-East.

November 18, 2021 Alberta Hansard 6283

COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout and Economic Recovery

Mr. Singh: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Alberta has made significant progress in the fight against COVID-19. As of November 9 over 82 per cent of eligible Albertans have received two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. This is good news, and the government is continuing to expand eligibility for the most vulnerable Albertans to receive a third booster shot, including elderly Albertans, First Nations, Métis, and Indigenous Albertans over 18, and front-line health care workers. This progress means that Alberta is another step closer to getting back to normal. While the Alberta government continues to address the health of Albertans, Alberta’s recovery plan is working to create more investment, good opportunities to help Albertans get back to work. In October Alberta’s unemployment rate fell to the lowest it has been since 2020. Last month Alberta added 20,000 new jobs, the province’s third consecutive month of significant job growth in a row. These newly created jobs mean that Alberta has recovered the number of jobs lost since the beginning of 2020. Through good policies such as the film and television tax credit and red tape reduction the government has been able to attract record-breaking investments in key sectors. Dow Chemical recently announced plans to build the world’s first net zero carbon emissions ethylene complex. This will be the largest private-sector investment to happen in Alberta in decades, reaching upward of $10 billion and creating thousands of jobs. Amazon Web Services recently announced Calgary, Alberta, as their choice to build a second Canadian hub. This will be the largest tech-sector investment in Alberta’s history at $4.3 billion and will create a thousand jobs. These are positive signs for the future of this province. Recently people all over Alberta celebrated Diwali, the festival of light. I celebrate because I truly believe the light will overcome the darkness and that Alberta’s brightest days are still ahead. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Camrose.

Federal-provincial Child Care Agreement

Ms Lovely: Well, thank you, Mr. Speaker. Alberta’s recovery plan is well under way, and everywhere you look jobs and investment are coming back to our great province. This has led to a jobs boom and concern from employers that they won’t be able to find all the workers they need to fill these new positions. Alberta’s historic new child care agreement with Ottawa will certainly get parents, particularly women, back into the workforce and support economic recovery. That’s good news for all Albertans. I want to thank the minister for fighting for this made-in-Alberta plan that respects Alberta’s mixed-market system and meets the unique needs of Alberta families. This plan will make child care more affordable for families with kids aged zero to kindergarten through cutting fees in half by early 2022, on average. By 2026 all Alberta families will pay an average of $10 per day for child care. This plan will also see investments in accessibility creating tens of thousands of new spaces across our province, including in rural ridings like mine. This plan for child care is good for families and good for the economy, and it doesn’t pick winners and losers like the Alberta NDP did with their failed $25-a-day program. They attempted to cut private child care operators, who made up 70 per cent of our child care system. In addition to private spaces, this plan will add at least 42,500 new licensed nonprofit and day home child care spaces over the

next five years in areas of the province where child care is in short supply. This $3.8 billion agreement also helps bring Alberta taxpayer dollars home from Ottawa and is an important step in Alberta’s fight for a fair deal from the federal government. Again, to the minister, thank you for working on this deal, that meets the unique needs of our province, that doesn’t pick winners and losers and protects a diverse system. Your effort will ensure that kids are getting the child care they deserve.

Premier’s Leadership

Mr. Loewen: After many no-good months the Premier is having a terrible, horrible, no-good, very bad week. Here’s a recap. On Monday, 22 UCP constituency associations announced they’d hit the threshold for forcing the leadership review the Premier is desperate to avoid. The Premier was at a press conference with the Prime Minister when the news broke. He couldn’t have looked any weaker. Also Monday the government used its majority to deny a debate regarding a private member’s motion critical of the Premier. That this Premier would hijack private members’ time to protect his own self-interest tells you everything you need to know. On Tuesday a letter between a member of this Assembly and the Premier leaked outlining the Premier and his enablers’ efforts to interfere with this weekend’s UCP AGM. This Premier ran for the leadership of the UCP on a commitment to grassroots democracy. It turns out that guarantee wasn’t worth the paper it was written on. On Wednesday the media picked up my letter to the Chief Electoral Officer asking him to clarify for the Premier and his enablers that this Assembly voted to remove the influence corporations once held over Alberta’s registered political parties. The Premier’s transparent attempt to use corporate money in his own bid to hold onto power by biasing the election of the UCP board that will oversee his leadership review is not going to win any hearts or minds. Today the media is hunting a second major allegation from Tuesday’s leaked letter, which is that Canada’s least popular Premier and his enablers have been using the weight of the Premier’s office to influence attendance at this weekend’s AGM. It’s also already clear that this weekend’s big news story will be that he has stacked the deck on the debate with rules that prevent anyone from tabling a new motion but himself. The Premier has paid party employees scrambling to alter bylaws to stave off an immediate review of his failed leadership. Albertans know your leadership for what it truly is: bullying and cronyism, employing any tactic and hiding behind any process to prevent Albertans from holding you accountable. Mr. Premier, becoming increasingly powerful amongst an increasingly shrinking number of enablers is not going to win Conservatives the 2023 election.

1:50 head: Oral Question Period

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Edmonton-Glenora has the call.

COVID-19 Contact Tracing

Ms Hoffman: Mr. Speaker, AHS documents prove the shocking truth. Just as a fourth wave hit Alberta, the UCP fired 1,400 contact tracers. Had tracing been protected, lives could have very well been saved. They would have reduced the impact of COVID on the more than 700 schools that faced outbreaks and alerts this fall alone. One contact tracer told the media, quote: it feels like our sleepless nights and long days during waves 1, 2, and 3 were for naught. Will the

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Premier apologize for devasting our public health care system and apologize to all of those suffering as a result of his choices?

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, what the member calls devastation was actually adding billions of dollars to the health care budget, a billion-dollar increase in the baseline budget, approximately $3 billion in surged funding to support our health care system and our front-line workers through COVID. With respect to contact tracing, since January 9 of this year AHS has been contacting and investigating all COVID-19 cases they receive each and every day. They’re reaching out to cases within 24 hours of receiving confirmation of their positive test result. There has been no backlog, none, in case investigation and contact tracing since the . . .

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Edmonton-Glenora.

Ms Hoffman: The Premier’s record is more than 3,000 Albertans who’ve died as a result of his mishandling of this pandemic. He cancelled contact tracing for schools – if he doesn’t know that, he deserves to be better briefed – and if he’s trying to mislead this House, that certainly is a serious concern, Mr. Speaker; 1,400 tracers were fired while the UCP was fixated on fights with front- line heroes and fights within their own caucus. Why didn’t the Premier hire back the contact tracers? Only 54 have been rehired of the 1,400 he fired. Why is he continuing to peddle information that’s not accurate? Fourteen hundred fired, Premier. Stand up, take responsibility . . .

Mr. Jason Nixon: Point of order.

Ms Hoffman: . . . and reverse this.

The Speaker: A point of order is noted at 1:52.

Mr. Kenney: Well, Mr. Speaker, it’s complete rubbish. In fact, as of October 5 there were 1,155 case investigators and contact tracers in addition to 247 casual staff, but the important thing is that we’re now averaging about 400 new daily cases. We have three investigators per case. We are achieving a turnaround in less that 24 hours. Only the NDP would ask us to have hundreds more surplus staff sitting around when there are no cases for them to trace. It makes no sense.

Ms Hoffman: The fourth wave was hardest on Alberta of all jurisdictions across this country, and the Premier’s failed leadership is to blame. With Dr. Hinshaw warning of a potential fifth wave, it’s more critical than ever to ensure that we have a fully staffed contact tracing system and as many people vaccinated as possible. One last time, Premier, because we continue to hear misinformation peddled: COVID is not the flu. The impacts on children can be serious. We expect a vaccine for kids to be available tomorrow. This is great news, but I fear that this Premier hasn’t learned lessons from his past failures. Will the Premier commit to having COVID- 19 vaccines available in schools?

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, once again the NDP is running down Alberta when, in fact, we should be proud of how Albertans have responded to our robust vaccine program: over 6.7 million doses delivered; we’re now at 88 per cent first-dose coverage amongst the eligible population, 83 per cent fully vaccinated, rolling out tens of thousands of booster shots. If and when Health Canada approves the pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines, we will of course make those readily available to parents and children between the ages of five and 11 as quickly as the federal government gets us adequate supply.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview is next.

Municipal Funding

Mr. Bilous: Mr. Speaker, I was proud to join our leader and caucus colleagues at the Alberta Municipalities convention, where we committed to being partners in prosperity. If elected, we will introduce legislation which ties municipal funding to provincial revenues – this will be a historic move – and we’ll make it clear that Alberta succeeds when we all succeed together. Will the Premier stand in this House and tell municipalities why he refuses to give them stable and predictable funding that they’ve needed and deserved for so long?

Mr. Kenney: Well, Mr. Speaker, we are giving, in the past couple of years, record levels of support for infrastructure, including municipal infrastructure grants to municipalities. At the same time we recognize – and I know this doesn’t matter to the NDP, but this government inherited from them a $9 billion deficit. We had a double recession and an economic and fiscal crisis of unprecedented scope last year. You know, the whole idea of stimulative spending is that you spend it when private-sector demand is down, and then you let the private sector take over with infrastructure investment. That’s exactly what we’re doing. It’s economically responsible.

Mr. Bilous: When we were in government, we formed the big-city charters. The Premier promised to maintain those historic agreements, but then he ripped them up. Instead, municipalities have been hit with cuts stacked upon cuts: MSI, gone; affordable housing money, gone; GIPOT funding, gone; green line, stalled. This government’s relationship with municipalities is in tatters, and they don’t even seem to care. They wasted money on a pipeline to nowhere, on a corporate handout that created no jobs. Premier, why should Alberta municipalities bear the brunt for this government’s horrible economic . . .

The Speaker: The hon. the Premier.

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, again complete nonsense from the NDP. In fact, we increased and surged to deal with the crisis; $700 million in municipal stabilization initiative funding directly to municipalities. I remember that in the second week of March, when we realized the scope of the COVID crisis, we called in the mayors of Calgary and Edmonton, the heads of AUMA to say: please bring forward your priority infrastructure list because we’re going to be sending you unprecedented fiscal support to help us deal with the recession. Seven hundred million dollars. We didn’t have to do it; we did it because it was the right thing.

Mr. Bilous: The Premier talks about economic growth, but we have record food bank use, thousands that have been kicked to the streets due to this government’s cuts, mass migration of young people out of the province, and families that can’t afford to pay rising bills for car insurance and electricity. When the UCP cut funding to municipalities, those costs are dumped onto Albertans in the form of property tax hikes. Premier, tell Albertans why you’re declaring victory as they’re forced to park their vehicles for good, take out a second mortgage, or go to the food bank to feed their families. Is the government really this tone-deaf, incompetent, or both?

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, completely of our own volition this government put forward half a billion dollars in extra discretionary urgent funding for municipal infrastructure priorities. In the spring of last year we added an additional $200 million in this budget. We

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are at record levels of infrastructure spending by the province and by municipalities. But at the end of the day, we cannot continue to encumber today’s and future taxpayers with endless growing debt. Albertans believe in fiscal responsibility. Well, they all do except the NDP.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Edmonton-City Centre has a question.

Rural Health Care and Emergency Medical Services

Mr. Shepherd: This government claims to support health care in rural communities, but their actions show just how empty their words are. The former Minister of Health ignored rural communities when he consolidated EMS dispatch, resulting in huge wait times, huge gaps in coverage, people waiting longer for care, and even, in some tragic cases, lives being lost. If the minister would remove his earplugs and listen to the voices of Wood Buffalo, Red Deer, Calgary, and Lethbridge, he’d realize that his government has gotten this wrong. Will the Premier commit to do the consultation and work his ministers have flatly refused to do and address these very real concerns about EMS in rural Alberta?

Mr. Kenney: Well, Mr. Speaker, there have been exhaustive consultations on exactly that issue and exhaustive studies. I believe that three separate independent studies have been done, all validating that EMS services can be delivered at high quality and with great speed through a co-ordinated approach. That’s exactly what this government is doing, following that expert advice that we have received. It works very well in Edmonton. There’s no reason this should not be able to work just as well in other municipalities, as it has been doing since the transition a few months ago.

Mr. Shepherd: The Premier’s one-size-fits-all model is not working in rural Alberta. On EMS consolidation the minister of labour chose to go with his gut, ignore concerns, and attack anyone who raised them. The result is clear: service is worsening. Sadly, with the UCP, arrogance and incompetence are far easier to find than access to an ambulance in rural Alberta. This is unacceptable. And while I know these ministers prefer talking points over taking real action, the Albertans I’m hearing from are tired of promises that they have no intention to fulfill. Will the Premier and Health ministry commit to sitting down with these mayors or these communities that are being failed before this gets worse? They’re here in town today. They’re concerned. Will they meet them? 2:00

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, we don’t need to make that commitment because we’ve been doing that constantly, and we’ll continue to. I know that the Minister of Health has an open door; his predecessor met repeatedly with the concerned municipalities. But let’s point out that since 2009 AHS has dispatched ambulances safely and successfully for 60 per cent of Albertans, covering most of the geographic area of the province, and there’s been absolutely no change for anyone who calls 911. Albertans benefit when emergency medical response is closely co-ordinated with the health care system and aligns with best practices for patient care.

Mr. Shepherd: Under the former Minister of Health the UCP drove doctors out of rural Alberta and crippled both the EMS and the health care systems. At the Alberta Municipalities convention we’ve heard about the negative impacts his decisions have had on rural communities. People with no doctors are forced to drive hours for routine procedures and tests. Sadly, the new minister clearly has no plan to fix the disaster he inherited, but perhaps he has something

that the labour minister did not, an apology. Will the Minister of Health apologize to rural Albertans for the stress, anxiety, and pain caused by his government’s failure, or should Albertans just expect more arrogance, incompetence, and harm?

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, this government has increased incentives for the recruitment and retention of rural physicians by $80 million a year each and every year – that’s baked into the budget – and that’s for about 700 and some rural physicians. It’s over $100,000 per physician. There are more physicians working in rural Alberta today than at any point in the past, including under the NDP government. This government is absolutely committed to continuing to improve access to health services all through rural Alberta.

Severe Weather Impact Mitigation and Response

Mr. Schmidt: As we watch the devastation unfolding in B.C., we are reminded again that climate change is real, and we are seeing the impacts right before our eyes. B.C. has faced wildfires, heat domes, and now debilitating floods. Of course, Alberta has endured its share of major disasters recently, too. Even if you don’t believe climate change is caused by humans, like some in the UCP believe, you cannot deny that our climate is changing, and we need to adapt. So why has this government cut funding for climate change adaptation?

Mr. Jason Nixon: Mr. Speaker, I have to confess that I was having trouble hearing the full question, but I did catch the end, in which the hon. member accuses the government of cutting funding when it comes to managing important issues like climate change inside our province. Nothing could be further from the truth. I’d encourage the member to have a look at some of the announcements over the last couple of weeks, in which this government in partnership with industry continues to invest in being able to make sure we can meet our environmental obligations but, most importantly, also sees a path forward for our largest industries in this province. That’s probably, at its core, what the hon. member is upset with. He doesn’t want a future for oil and gas, but we will make sure there is one.

Mr. Schmidt: Disasters are becoming more severe and more common. In the last 10 years we’ve seen fires and floods in Fort McMurray, a devastating fire in Slave Lake, flooding that consumed Calgary’s downtown, and a hailstorm that caused widespread damage in the city’s northeast. The UCP has not only cut funding, but they’ve ignored Alberta’s communities. They forced Fort McMurray to pay entirely for their own flood mitigation while simultaneously cutting disaster recovery program funding. Why is this Premier and his government leaving communities vulnerable after they’ve already been through so much?

Mr. Jason Nixon: Well, as I said yesterday, Mr. Speaker, the hon. member never misses an opportunity to be wrong. This government has invested a considerable amount to help communities deal with things like floods and being able to mitigate severe weather impacts in this province, including just recently getting across the line the Springbank dry dam, something that his government completely and utterly failed at. We’re also seeing some of the largest investments in decades in things like irrigation, which also helps with flood mitigation, and the department of environment, the Department of Municipal Affairs, and the Department of Transportation continue to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in things like flood mitigation all across the province.

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Mr. Schmidt: All across the province except in Fort McMurray. Mr. Speaker, the Premier and his minister don’t seem to understand the urgency of the damage caused by climate change, probably because he doesn’t think it’s real. I’ll try to phrase it in a way that he might understand. The Fort McMurray fire caused $10 billion in damage, the Calgary flood caused $5 billion in damage, the hailstorm in Calgary was over a billion dollars, and the Slave Lake fire was almost a billion dollars. That’s roughly $15 billion in 10 years just to start. Why is this government cutting climate change adaptation that will save lives, protect our economy and . . .

The Speaker: The hon. Government House Leader.

Mr. Jason Nixon: Mr. Speaker, the answer is that we continue to invest heavily in supporting municipalities and dealing with things like emergency management, and we will continue to. But what we have changed is that we got rid of the NDP’s job-killing carbon tax, we stopped doing everything that the federal government told the NDP to do – and they did everything that they asked when it came to climate change – and instead put in made-in-Alberta solutions that made sure that our industries can survive, and, most importantly, saved Alberta hockey moms and hockey dads money. That’s the difference between us when it comes to climate change. They want to tax everybody to death. We want to get jobs going in this province.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Grande Prairie is next.

Petrochemicals and Hydrogen Industries

Mrs. Allard: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Last week I had the pleasure of joining colleagues, including the Premier and the Minister of Finance, as we celebrated another exciting announcement for Alberta’s hydrogen economy. Northern Petrochemical Corporation announced plans to invest $2.5 billion in a new petrochemical facility in the municipal district of Greenview. This announcement was another example of Alberta’s recovery and investment attraction strategies at work. To the Premier: can you please explain how this investment from Northern Petrochemical will benefit the region of Grande Prairie and contribute to the overall economic recovery of our province?

Mr. Kenney: Absolutely, Mr. Speaker, and I’d like to thank the Member for Grande Prairie for her leadership and involvement in this, her participation in that announcement, a very exciting, game- changing announcement for the northwest of Alberta. That $2.5 billion capital investment from a private-sector company will, they estimate, create 4,000 upfront construction-phase jobs – 4,000 jobs – and 400 permanent high-paying jobs after that, bringing onboard world-leading technology to produce ammonia, which will help us as we develop the hydrogen economy, for the safe transportation of ammonia. It’s jobs. It’s diversification. It’s good for the environment. It’s great news for Grande Prairie.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Grande Prairie.

Mrs. Allard: Thank you, Mr. Speaker and, through you, to the Premier. Given that we have seen huge growth in our hydrogen sector over recent months through several large-scale investments and given the success in my region of the MD of Greenview in their investment attraction effort at the Greenview industrial gateway and further given the great work from Energy and the recently released hydrogen road map for Alberta, again to the Premier: can you please share the plan to keep up this momentum and add to the stream of investments and, further, what we expect for Alberta’s hydrogen economy in the coming months?

Mr. Kenney: Absolutely, Mr. Speaker. I should add in that context that this project has a commitment to net zero production, net zero emissions. I know the NDP. All they want to do when it comes to climate issues is to tax the heck out of people when this is actually about creating jobs by investing in technology. You know, the president of that company was very clear at the announcement that this only happened because of the policies of this government: the open for business policies, the red tape cutting policies, the low-tax policies, the Alberta petrochemical incentive program, the natural gas strategy, the hydrogen vision, and all of that.

The Speaker: The hon. member.

Mrs. Allard: Thank you, Mr. Speaker and, again through you, to the Premier. Given that Alberta is already the top hydrogen producer in Canada – I’ll say that again: we are the top hydrogen producer in Canada – and that we are well on our way to becoming a global leader in clean hydrogen production and given that by 2050 the world’s hydrogen sector is predicted to be worth $2.5 trillion, with a T, and further given the geological formation which provides Alberta with a competitive advantage to facilitate carbon capture right here at home, to the Premier: can you please share how Albertans all across the province can benefit for years to come from expanding our hydrogen economy?

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, we have seen five major hydrogen projects announced in the past nine months alone, I believe. I was meeting with the president of a global company who flew up from the States to meet me in Calgary last week, talking about another $3 billion on that project. We are working with several others. I truly believe that Alberta will become a major global hub in an industry that some estimate will be worth $2.5 trillion over the next couple of decades. It’s happening here. It’s happening now. It’s happening because of our government’s policies.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Calgary-McCall.

Provincial Police Force Proposal

Mr. Sabir: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Minister of Justice has promised a serious consultation on his bullheaded plan to create an Alberta provincial police force. Municipalities oppose this idea. They see it as a waste of money, and, no, it won’t do a thing to address the challenges with rural crime in their communities. I have consulted with rural councillors at Alberta Municipalities and couldn’t find a single supporter of this bogus proposal. Can the minister identify one rural council that has vouched full support for his idea of a provincial police force? And be specific. Just give one name. 2:10

Mr. Schweitzer: Mr. Speaker, this question makes me a little bit nostalgic, and I’ve got to deal a little bit here. When it comes to the NDP legacy tour bus when it comes to rural crime – dust it off; it’s an oldie but goody – this government has done more on rural crime in its time in office to address those challenges than the entire time the NDP was in office, when they didn’t even know rural crime was an issue. We’re going to continue to be there for these communities, making sure we address the issues that are there to make sure people are safe in every community of Alberta.

Mr. Sabir: Given that the RCMP continues to investigate the UCP leadership race for allegations of voter fraud, it’s concerning that the UCP continues to push to replace the RCMP. Given that municipalities don’t support removing the RCMP and think we

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need to invest in policing and not the UCP’s silly political games, can the minister pledge to commit at the Alberta Municipalities convention tomorrow that he will put a full stop to this idea until he has consulted and achieved broad consensus with municipalities and the investigation has been concluded? Any minister who has not been contacted with the RCMP can . . .

The Speaker: The hon. minister.

Mr. Schweitzer: Mr. Speaker, the hypocrisy is rich in the air here today. Where was the NDP when we made the announcement to put 900 – let me say that again: 900 – law enforcement personnel on the ground to deal with rural crime? Where was the NDP? You know where they were? Heads in the sand. That’s why we had to bust out that NDP legacy tour bus on rural crime because they had no legacy on the issue, period. We’re going to be there for these com- munities, making sure they have the best possible law enforcement.

Mr. Sabir: Given that the minister continues to press ahead with a provincial police force despite the objections of municipalities and given that nobody trusts this minister, this Premier, or their government and given that the Minister of Justice loves holding referendums but he refuses to hold one on this because he knows his proposal would be soundly defeated, will the minister commit to a referendum on creating a provincial police force so he can hear directly from Albertans just how bad his idea is?

Mr. Schweitzer: Mr. Speaker, you know what Albertans don’t trust? The NDP on rural crime. This had a resounding vote in the last election, where all of rural Alberta voted for the United Conservative Party because of our robust rural crime strategy that we’ve implemented to make sure we have safe communities across this province. The NDP don’t like that. They’re riled up over there because they know they didn’t deliver on rural crime for four years. This government will. [interjections]

Mr. Jason Nixon: Point of order.

The Speaker: A point of order is noted at 2:13. [interjections] Order.

Electric Power Prices

Ms Ganley: Yesterday the UCP introduced a bill that will, among other things, allow storage to participate in the grid. I appreciate that this will bring electricity costs down in the very long term, but Albertans are struggling right now. In the last two and a half years, since the UCP took power, the cost of just about everything has skyrocketed. In the last year natural gas bills have nearly doubled, and the average family electricity bill has increased by 37 per cent. Minister, this is a serious issue for Alberta families. They need action now. What is the UCP government’s plan to help Albertans with their massive electricity bills?

Mr. Toews: Mr. Speaker, we recognize that we are in an inflationary environment. It’s caused by a multiple of factors, including disruption in supply chains, I would say, irresponsible fiscal management federally as well as current monetary policy, and, of course, the disruption of the pandemic. What we are doing for Alberta families and for Albertans is positioning this economy for investment attraction, growth, and job opportunities. We know that the best way for Albertans to get ahead is to have a good, well-paying job.

Ms Ganley: Given that the NDP opposition warned the government in July that electricity costs were going to go up and given that in April 52 per cent of Albertans indicated they were less than $200

per month away from not being able to pay their bills but this whole UCP cabinet seems not to understand the stress that many Albertans are experiencing right now, can the minister please set aside the partisan sniping, acknowledge that the government has been in power for two and a half years, and tell Albertans what he plans to do to help them with rising electricity costs right now?

The Speaker: The hon. the Associate Minister of Natural Gas and Electricity.

Mr. Nally: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We are empathetic with any Albertans that are struggling with the high cost of electricity or gas right now. [interjections] You know, they’re heckling hysterically across the aisle when we have a serious issue to discuss. There are Albertans that are struggling right now. I would encourage any Albertan that is struggling with the higher cost of utilities – because we do have an open market, that is a product of supply and demand – to reach out to the Utilities Consumer Advocate. They have some choices and some assistance that they can get from them. Thank you. [interjections]

The Speaker: Order. Order. The hon. member is the only one.

Ms Ganley: Given that the Energy minister has plenty of money for a failed war room, an inquiry that found no wrongdoing, and $19 million for other advocacy but can’t even tell us what they spent it on and given that Alberta families are genuinely struggling right now and want to hear a plan, not more rhetoric, please, can anyone in the UCP government stand up and acknowledge that Albertans are struggling with basic costs, like heating and electricity, and tell them what they’re going to do to make this easier right now?

Mr. Nally: Mr. Speaker, the ability of the NDP to not let the truth get in the way of a good story is absolutely legendary. I’ll tell you that everybody here knows that the reason Albertans are paying more for their high electricity costs is because they spent $4 billion, on their watch, on transmission and distribution, and ratepayers have to pay that back. But wait; there’s more. They lost $1.2 billion on the Balancing Pool. Guess who they stuck that bill on? The ratepayer. The best thing we can do is to keep them out of govern- ment. [interjections]

The Speaker: Order. Order.

Economic Development and Investment Attraction

Mr. Barnes: This week the government announced that the richest man in the world plans to build a new data centre at a secret location in the Calgary area for the year 2037. If there’s one thing that Albertans have come to understand when it comes to this government’s announcements, it’s that if something sounds too good to be true, it is. Given this government’s dismal record when it comes to investing taxpayer money, direct subsidies, and other corporate welfare schemes that pick market winners and losers, to the Premier: can you tell us the total value of the subsidies and other tax incentives promised to the richest man in the world?

Mr. Schweitzer: None.

Mr. Barnes: Mr. Speaker, given that this Premier will take credit for even opening a McDonald’s, Albertans can never be sure when to take him at his word, which brings us to the proposed 2026 petrochemical plant. Given that we know that this project is being subsidized through the petrochemicals incentive program – according to a leaked brief petrochemical subsidies often benefit projects that would’ve went ahead anyway – and given this government’s record

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with the Sturgeon refinery fiasco, again to the Premier. Albertans want to know how much of our hard-earned taxpayer money he is dumping into this new project.

Mr. Toews: Mr. Speaker, we will not apologize for positioning Alberta’s economy for disproportionate investment attraction. We believe that we have a great future in petrochemical investment in this province. We also compete with other jurisdictions, and that’s why we’ve gone forward with the Alberta petrochemicals incentive program. That incentive program is landing billions of dollars of investment in this province that will create jobs and opportunities for all Albertans.

Mr. Barnes: Mr. Speaker, given that he should apologize for a $17 billion deficit and given that in the Fraser Institute’s latest report on economic freedom across North America in just three years Alberta has dropped from first to 33rd and given that the Premier has stated, “Picking winners and losers is not a strategy for long-term economic success” and given that the Premier would, and I quote again, get the Alberta government out of the business of business, again to the Premier. Albertans want to know why you continue to do the exact opposite of what you promised Albertans.

The Speaker: The hon. the Minister of Finance.

Mr. Toews: Well, thank you, Mr. Speaker. The commitment we made to Albertans during the election campaign was to focus on jobs, the economy, and pipelines. We are delivering on that commit- ment. I can start going through the list of investment announce- ments recently: Northern Petrochemical Corporation, $2.5 billion; Dow Chemical, a multibillion-dollar project, the world’s first net zero carbon emissions petrochemical plant in the Industrial Heartland; Air Products, $1.3 billion in net zero hydrogen energy. We made a commitment to Albertans, and we’re delivering on that commitment. [interjections]

The Speaker: Order.

2:20 United Conservative Party

Mr. Dang: Yesterday I sent a letter to the Chief Electoral Officer regarding the Premier’s cash-for-claps scheme. The allegations are that the Premier’s office is using third-party advertisers to pay AGM fees in exchange for votes at this weekend’s UCP AGM. These are serious allegations and, if true, would constitute breaking election financing laws. Rather than deny the allegations, the Premier actually defended them. In fact, he said that there is nothing wrong with doing this. Is the Premier admitting that the scheme taking place is legal and that he sees nothing wrong with it, or is it government policy to ignore the provincial election financing legislation?

Mr. Jason Nixon: Well, Mr. Speaker, another week and another fake NDP investigation. I suspect that this one will end up the same as every other one that the NDP does, with an independent officer of this Chamber saying that the NDP is wrong again. Now, the real question, though, I think for this Chamber, Mr. Speaker, is why the NDP continues to distract. I’ll tell you why. As I said yesterday, the Official Opposition wants to distract from the fact that Alberta is leading this country in recovery with $7 billion worth of investment over the last week or so, thousands of jobs being created while the NDP continue just to fail.

Mr. Dang: Given that these allegations are coming from within this minister’s own caucus and given that this wouldn’t be the first time the UCP has played fast and loose with our election laws and given

that the Member for Calgary-East had his business raided after being accused of buying fake memberships and given that the Member for Calgary-Falconridge was fined over $30,000 for accepting illegal donations and given that the Premier’s own leader- ship race is under investigation by the RCMP for alleged voter fraud and given that the Premier has insisted that PACs paying fees is normal and legal but given that Bill 81 rewrites the law to allow third parties to pay fees on behalf of delegates, can the Premier explain: if what the PACs are doing is legal, why is he changing the law to create a loophole?

Mr. Jason Nixon: There we go again: the hon. member talking about another member of this place, Mr. Speaker, who has not been charged with anything and making accusations in this Chamber about a fellow peer. It’s appalling. I can turn around and do the same about things that we hear about members across the way, but I won’t bother with that because I know what the Official Opposition is doing. They’re trying to distract from the good news in this province. We’re happy to see Albertans being able to move forward. Again, the largest economic recovery in this country is taking place right now inside this province, billions of dollars worth of investment. I expect that the NDP will continue their habits of fear and smear to distract from that, but Albertans aren’t buying it.

Mr. Dang: Given that the Associate Minister of Status of Women has been linked in media reports to electoral fraud committed in the 2017 UCP leadership contest and given that Albertans deserve trust in the government cabinet, in the Premier’s office, and in the government of Alberta as whole, is it the policy of this government to break the law, or will the Associate Minister of Status of Women stand for the record and tell this House whether she was involved in any scheme to buy memberships, stockpile voting credentials, or any other form of fraud during the 2017 UCP leadership campaign?

Mr. Jason Nixon: Well, Mr. Speaker, that hon. member: I often hear rumours about him when it comes to the sexual harassment investigation associated with the Official Opposition.

Ms Gray: Point of order.

Mr. Jason Nixon: But, Mr. Speaker, I would never rise in this Chamber normally and bring that up. He’s disparaging another hon. member of this place with no evidence. It’s appalling. It’s against parliamentary democracy. It’s absolutely ridiculous what you see from the Official Opposition, but they continue to just want to distract from the success of Albertans. That’s their main focus. They will always be the party of fear and smear. That’s all they are. [interjections]

The Speaker: Order. A point of order is noted at 2:24.

Restrictions Exemption Program Implementation

Member Loyola: Here we are again: another day, another broken promise this UCP government has made to Alberta small businesses. It has been over six weeks since this Premier promised to create legal protection for businesses requiring COVID-19 vaccines and still nothing. We’re getting closer to the end of this sitting, and small-business owners are getting nervous. To the minister: will there be legislation to protect small-business owners who enforce vaccine mandates, and if so, when?

Mr. Schweitzer: Mr. Speaker, we’re continuing to consult with small businesses as well as chambers and other business

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organizations around Alberta to make sure that we do our homework on this. We’ve talked with legal counsel as well to make sure that any potential legislation would add value to the situation. This is also playing out in the courts across Canada, with private-sector companies putting in place mandatory vaccine requirements that are being upheld. Again, we’re working with our legal counsel and other things on this to make sure we get this right.

Member Loyola: Given that this Premier promised to provide legal protections for employers who require staff to be vaccinated and given that this government is now looking to weaken the vaccine passport program by including natural immunity and given that small businesses have already implemented hiring and firing practices based on the protection promised by this Premier, will this minister guarantee here and now that he will not water down employers’ legal protections by including natural immunity or negative-testing exemptions within the legislation?

Mr. Schweitzer: Mr. Speaker, as I already said in my other answer, we’re continuing to consult with industry. We’re continuing to consult as well with the legal community to make sure that any proposed legislation would actually add value – that’s a question – as well as this matter has also been going on across the courts, across Canada. We’re going to continue to consult to make sure we have the right policy for Alberta.

Member Loyola: Given that this government threw small-business owners under the bus by forcing them to opt in to vaccine passports and making them the target of harassment and abuse and given that this government has taken over seven months to pay out the funds that were promised to them for the third wave and given that thousands of businesses were denied help because of the failure of his own program, to the minister. Small-business owners know they can only trust this government once they see it in writing. Will he commit to tabling the bill by Monday so that small-business owners know they won’t be abandoned . . .

The Speaker: The hon. minister.

Mr. Schweitzer: Mr. Speaker, to all the small-business owners that are listening right now, I will encourage them, if they put in place the restrictions exemption program, to apply right now for $2,000 of support. We’ve been there throughout this pandemic. Over 120,000 businesses have received support, over $700 million through the relaunch grant program alone. That means that right now with the restrictions exemption program an additional $2,000 is also available for small businesses.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Grande Prairie has a question.

Federal-provincial Child Care Agreement

Mrs. Allard: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Like so many Albertans, I want to congratulate the Minister of Children’s Services for her tireless efforts in getting a made-in-Alberta child care deal done with the federal government. Alberta’s recovery plan is working, and jobs and investment are coming back to our province. Indeed, we all understand that giving families access to affordable, quality child care is essential for the economy now more than ever and good for all Albertans, including my constituents in Grande Prairie. To the minister, who I know was working on this deal until the final hours: how exactly will this plan support Alberta parents with young children and help get our people back to work?

The Speaker: The hon. the Minister of Children’s Services.

Ms Schulz: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker, and I do want to thank the member for her advocacy on this as well. Through this $3.8 billion investment we will see more affordable, accessible, high-quality child care and new spaces created right across this province. This means that parents, especially working moms, can rejoin or stay in the workforce and help to build Alberta’s economic recovery. Dianna de Sousa, the executive director of the Fort McMurray Chamber of Commerce, had this to say about our plan: “Access and affordability are important, but flexibility to support shift-working parents is an essential, game-changing, vital piece of this plan and we’re happy the Government of Alberta has heard the perspective of these parents.”

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Grande Prairie.

Mrs. Allard: Thank you, Mr. Speaker and through you to the minister. Given that the minister was unwavering in her support for Alberta’s mixed-market system while negotiating this deal and also unrelenting in her determination to forge a deal that was truly responsive to the needs of Alberta families and given that the federal government called an unnecessary election in the middle of negotiations, which ultimately left the minister with a new federal counterpart, again to the minister: can you detail for Albertans, including my constituents, some of the obstacles you faced in negotiating this agreement that led to these delays?

The Speaker: The hon. Minister of Children’s Services.

Ms Schulz: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Although the end result was definitely a win for Alberta families, there were a few obstacles along the way as we were negotiating this deal. First of all, Alberta was the last province to receive our term sheet, a number of weeks after other provinces, which was somewhat frustrating. We then also had the Prime Minister call an election that I don’t think any Canadians were really asking for. That did delay us a little bit more as well. We had a plan supported by child care operators and business leaders right across this province that was delivered to the federal government. A couple of weeks later we were very happy to see a minister appointed. Within three days we met, and I let her know the urgency of getting this deal done.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Grande Prairie. 2:30

Mrs. Allard: Thank you, Mr. Speaker and again, through you, to the minister. Understanding that Albertans pay a disproportionate amount of taxes to Ottawa and that we here in Alberta know the importance of securing an appropriate amount of money back in reinvestment to our province and given that we’re discussing federal funding being committed in an area of provincial jurisdiction and further given that some people don’t understand the full importance and benefit of providing affordable, quality child care, again to the minister: can you explain to Albertans why it’s important to bring these dollars back to Alberta and ensure our families here are getting a fair deal from Ottawa?

Ms Schulz: Absolutely, Mr. Speaker. Obviously, just a few weeks ago we had a referendum that, you know, reiterated that 62 per cent of Albertans want a fair deal. They want to see their hard-earned tax dollars come back to our province instead of going to pay for programs like this in other provinces right across the country. We did negotiate hard. We got a fair deal, one that respects and reflects the choices that Alberta parents are making each and every day, unlike the members opposite, who chose to leave out nearly 70 per

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cent of parents and spaces within our mixed-market system. [interjections]

The Speaker: Order.

School Bus Insurance Costs

Mr. Dach: Albertans owe a debt of gratitude to our school bus drivers, who during this pandemic went above and beyond to safely transport children to and from schools, but the only thanks this government seems willing to give them is a massive insurance rate hike that threatens their very livelihoods. Ernie Smith, who drives a bus for Grande Yellowhead public school division, revealed that his premiums had increased by 50 per cent. That is unacceptable, Mr. Speaker. What specifically is the Transportation minister doing to address these shocking insurance premium increases before the UCP drives our school buses out of business?

The Speaker: The hon. the Minister of Finance and President Treasury Board has risen.

Mr. Toews: Well, thank you, Mr. Speaker. We certainly acknowledge that there is a hard insurance market in this province, that there is a hard insurance market across the country and, in fact, around the world, and we also recognize that it has affected school bus transportation businesses. The good news that I can report today is that for this upcoming school year, every school bus transportation business and group has insurance in place. So that’s good news. We’re working with officials in Education to ensure that there are long-term solutions. [interjections]

The Speaker: Order.

Mr. Dach: Given that Alberta’s NDP put in a rate cap at 5 per cent annually on auto insurance but this UCP government removed this after being lobbied by their friends and given that now as a result some drivers are seeing their insurance premiums skyrocket by 50 per cent right now and given that this threatens critical school bus drivers and service that is relied on by families to get kids to and from school, will the Minister of Transportation go back to her colleagues with a proposal to reinstate the 5 per cent cap, or will she sit silently and risk some school buses being put in park for good? It’s not a hard insurance policy; it’s impossible.

The Speaker: The hon. Minister of Finance.

Mr. Toews: Well, thank you, Mr. Speaker. Again, we certainly acknowledge the challenges for school bus operators, and we’re working on long-term solutions and recognize that this year every school bus driver has insurance in place. What I cannot understand is the fact that the members opposite simply look to put in rate caps to solve problems, Mr. Speaker, within insurance. Rate caps ultimately lead to a loss of product offering, a loss of competition, and in the long term fewer products and higher costs for consumers. This government brought in Bill 41. It corrected some long-term issues in the industry and results in lower premiums.

Mr. Dach: When school bus companies go insolvent later on this year, he’ll be wishing he had a rate cap in place. Given that this year Ernie Smith saw a 50 per cent increase in his insurance but last year he saw an even greater hike, 358 per cent in a single year, and given that contractors are directly blaming the decision of this government to lift the 5 per cent cap on insurance that our government introduced, will this minister agree that a 400 per cent increase in insurance costs is way too much to put on a

school bus driver over just two years? Will she, then, commit that this government will stop putting the profits of insurance companies over the future of Alberta students?

The Speaker: The hon. minister.

Mr. Toews: Well, thank you, Mr. Speaker. Again, with respect to school bus operators, this year every school bus operator has insurance in place. We’re working on long-term solutions. Mr. Speaker, the members opposite did not deal with one issue in insurance. They simply put a rate cap on. We brought forward Bill 41, which deals with substantive issues within insurance. It’s resulting in long-term premium stability. We’ve also brought in Bill 76, the captive insurance corporations act. It will also provide solutions to our insurance challenges. I expect every member on the opposite side to support that bill.

Mental Health Services

Member Irwin: Every day I connect with Albertans. The issues they raise are varied, but one comes up all the time, mental health. People share with me their struggles, feelings of isolation and loneliness, and, for some, their thoughts of suicide. They tell me how inaccessible and unaffordable mental health services are. It’s hard enough for folks like me with a whole lot of privilege to access mental health supports, so I can’t imagine what it’s like for those who struggle with poverty and other barriers. There were gaps in mental health supports prior to the pandemic; they’ve only widened since. We called on this government to provide access to free mental health sessions. Will they today commit to making this a reality?

Mr. Ellis: Mr. Speaker, mental health has been a top priority for this government. We’ve committed millions of dollars in supports. We streamlined the system, the 211 system, certainly a system that was not streamlined under that previous government. We can ensure that on a 24/7 basis anyone can call 211 to ensure that they can access resources when it comes to mental health and/or addiction. Thank you.

Member Irwin: Given that mental health of young people should be a priority for every single person in this building and given that this is the same government that has historically denied that there’s a mental health crisis amongst children and we know that without clear supports for kids many will continue to suffer, to the Minister of Education. In August we proposed a plan to support the mental health of students, which included mental health support workers in every school. The minister refused to commit then, but we’re asking again. Will she commit now to prioritizing kids’ mental health? It’s too important to say no.

Mr. Ellis: Well, Mr. Speaker, as I indicated, mental health is absolutely a priority, mental health for children in schools. I’ve been working with the minister. I’ve been working with the Children’s Services minister. Again, this is a priority for this government. In fact, even a short time ago I visited the construction of the new centre for child and adolescent mental health, which is being built in Calgary right now. I mean, this is something that is going to help countless youth improve their mental health while pursuing recovery in the years to come. This government absolutely supports mental health for young people.

Member Irwin: Given that members of the 2SLGBTQ-plus community report high levels of mental health concerns, with

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almost 65 per cent of transgender youth in Alberta between the ages of 19 and 25 having considered suicide at some point in their lives, and given that more than 90 per cent of trans youth in our province between 14 and 18 don’t seek help for their mental health because they’re too scared that their parents will find out and as we approach the Trans Day of Remembrance, it’s on all of us to ensure that trans Albertans are protected, loved, and seen, to the minister: what steps will this government take to immediately support the mental health of transgender Albertans? I need you to be specific.

Mr. Ellis: Mr. Speaker, as part of the work that I did when I was on the Alberta Secretariat for Action on Homelessness, certainly youth homelessness and youth mental health was a priority even back then and disproportionately at that time affected the LGBTQ community even years and years ago. What have we done? Well, we’ve had these youth mental health hubs. We’ve invested $7 million through- out the province to ensure that young people have access to youth mental health. We can ensure that we can streamline that system to ensure that all children can have that access and that they can get the help that they need.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Red Deer-South.

Alberta Health Services

Mr. Stephan: Thank you. While many competent health professionals serve in Alberta Health Services, AHS is a public- sector monopoly. Mr. Speaker, Albertans need government account- ability, including AHS. Alberta will spend $23 billion in health, among the highest per capita in Canada and over 40 per cent of this province’s budget. To the minister: with this massive amount of money, why on a per capita basis can’t AHS even produce half of the ICUs of the worst of any U.S. . . .

The Speaker: The hon. Minister of Health.

Mr. Copping: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you to the hon. member for the question. Building up ICU resiliency and capacity is one of my three main priorities as Minister of Health. Let me be clear. It is not accurate to compare Alberta’s health care system to the U.S. system. It’s comparing apples to oranges. Our baseline number of ICU beds has always been adequate to care for Albertans outside of the pandemic. AHS increased capacity as needed through- out the pandemic though it’s come at the expense of postponing surgeries. I know that’s been challenging for many Albertans, and I want to assure them that very soon we’ll present a plan to get back to a hundred per cent and reduce the backlog created by the fourth wave.

Mr. Stephan: Given that the Society for Hospital Expansion in Central Alberta estimates that under prior Redford and Notley governments central Albertans only got one-tenth of the provincial average from AHS for health infrastructure funding and given that under the NDP occupation the Red Deer hospital was dropped from the infrastructure priority list and that, while corrected, the NDP did nothing for the hospital, to the minister. These prior governments failed. Can we be better? Will this government provide fairness for central Albertans? 2:40

The Speaker: Just prior to proceeding, no matter what the circum- stances are, whether referring to another government or not, the use of a proper name of a member would be inappropriate. I’m sure you’ll be happy to apologize and withdraw. The hon. Minister of Health.

Mr. Copping: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Let me be clear. Alberta’s government remains committed to the Red Deer regional hospital centre. The project is currently in phase 2 of 4, planning and design. As part of phase 2 Alberta Health Services has been engaging with members of the public as well as conducting a complete review of all components of the hospital. AHS is examining the number and location of operating rooms for surgical and acute care, the need for in-patient beds in comparison with the current number, and which programs or departments need them. We’re going to make sure that the Red Deer hospital expansion crosses the finish line.

Mr. Stephan: Thank you, Minister. Given that NDP AHS forced a drug consumption site upon Red Deer, ignoring the wishes of the community, and given that this drug consumption site resulted in lawlessness and more harm, imprisoning individuals in their addictions, and given that the better way is to love and support our neighbours to become free from addictions, to the minister. There is a better way. Will this government provide hope for long-suffering Red Deer businesses and families and reverse the destruction from the NDP drug site?

The Speaker: The hon. the Associate Minister of Mental Health and Addictions.

Mr. Ellis: Thank you very much, and thank you to the member for the question. The member is correct about one thing, and that is that the NDP did force the site into the community without appropriate consultation. Mr. Speaker, that’s why we’ve introduced quality standards for overdose prevention sites now that require operators to engage in comprehensive ongoing community consultation. It is vital to do consultation. Our government will be working with com- munities on better solutions moving forward, not ignoring the communities, like the NDP did. Thank you.

Ms Gray: Point of order.

The Speaker: Hon. members, a point of order is noted at 2:42. This concludes the time allotted for Oral Question Period. I encourage all members, if they are heading home to their constituencies today, to please drive safely and be kind to one another. In 30 seconds or less we will proceed to the remainder of the daily Routine.

head: Tabling Returns and Reports

The Speaker: Are there tablings? The hon. the Member for Leduc- Beaumont, followed by Lac Ste. Anne-Parkland.

Mr. Rutherford: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In accordance with section 19(5) of the Auditor General Act as chair of the Standing Committee on Legislative Offices I am pleased to table the report of the Auditor General of Alberta for November 2021.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Lac Ste. Anne-Parkland, followed by the Member for Edmonton-McClung.

Mr. Getson: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yeah. I would like to table a bunch of serology exams that have taken place within the province of Alberta, working in conjunction with the Mayo Clinic, showing efficacy before and after vaccinations when it comes to antigen levels.

The Speaker: The hon. Member for Edmonton-McClung.

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Mr. Dach: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today to table the requisite five copies of an article written in the Calgary Herald by Licia Corbella a few days ago that I referred to. It’s entitled: Rural Bus Line Will Go Bust without a Hand Up from Alberta Government that Doesn’t Seem to Care. It refers to Cold Shot bus line, which received an unsolicited $102,000 assistance grant from B.C. but nothing from Alberta.

head: Tablings to the Clerk

The Clerk: I wish to advise the Assembly that the following documents were deposited with the office of the Clerk: on behalf of hon. Mr. Copping, Minister of Health, pursuant to the Health Professions Act the College of Alberta Dental Assistants annual report 2020-21, the College of Alberta Psychologists 2020-21 annual report, the College of Dental Technologists of Alberta 2020 annual report, the College of Hearing Aid Practitioners of Alberta 2020 annual report, the College of Midwives of Alberta 2020 annual report, the College of Podiatric Physicians of Alberta 2020 annual report, the Physiotherapy Alberta College + Association 2020 annual report.

The Speaker: Hon. members, we are at points of order. There were a number of points of order called today during Oral Question Period. The first one was identified at 1:52 p.m. The Deputy Government House Leader.

Mr. Schow: Mr. Speaker, thank you. I’d like to withdraw that point of order.

The Speaker: I consider that matter dealt with and concluded. At approximately 2:13 a point of order was raised, while the hon. Minister of Jobs, Economy and Innovation was speaking, by the Government House Leader, in fact.

Mr. Schow: Without the benefit of the Blues, Mr. Speaker, I’m not in a position to argue the point of order, so I withdraw that one as well.

The Speaker: I consider that matter dealt with and concluded. I might just comment that if anyone is making comments on or off the record that the Speaker cannot hear, they ought to be remotely close to parliamentary. At 2:24 an additional point of order was called by the hon. Opposition House Leader while the Government House Leader was speaking.

Point of Order Allegations against a Member

Ms Gray: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. At approximately 2:24 the Member for Edmonton-South was asking questions regarding what appear to be some serious concerns about third- party advertisers paying AGM fees in exchange for votes at this weekend’s UCP AGM. This is a matter of government business given that Bill 81 is currently up for debate as well as current election law, and he was very deliberate in his wording to ensure that it was regarding government policy. During the questioning, given, I think, the vulnerability that the Government House Leader feels on this particular issue, which, I will mention, numerous media articles have been written about, Albertans are concerned about, and that the UCP MLA for Airdrie- Cochrane raised originally, which is how the Official Opposition was asking questions, these serious, legitimate concerns deserve answers.

As the Official Opposition it is our job to ask these questions. But in order to avoid responding to these serious allegations, the Government House Leader said: “That hon. member,” referring to the Member for Edmonton-South, “I often hear rumours about him when it comes to the sexual harassment investigation associated with the Official Opposition.” Mr. Speaker, this is an incredibly sensitive issue, that he is accusing a member of this caucus of being involved in a sexual harassment allegation. Now, I will also point out that the government has recently not only been accused of sexual harassment, but a lawsuit has begun, and they are accused of not handling that properly. I would like to suggest that on the matter that the Government House Leader is talking about, the Official Opposition hired a third-party investigator and handled it appropriately. Names were never shared out of respect for the victims in those situations, and now it is being raised only to deflect, to avoid answers, to distract from a terrible record and a legitimate issue originally raised by the MLA for Airdrie-Cochrane. We’ve seen this behaviour from the government on multiple occasions, in previous sessions. On March 23 the Government House Leader raised these accusations and named members of our caucus, which he has done again today. April 13: again he performed the same act. We raised a point of order, and you cautioned the member. Members in this Chamber know that accusations such as this, if they were made outside of this Chamber, would be a potential lawsuit yet are using their privileges inside this House, saying things they know are not true, that they cannot say outside. It is shameful behaviour, particularly when a member of the opposition is following up on concerns from a member of their own caucus. I raise the point of order under 23(h), (i), and (j) as well as the rules of this place and our procedures. I think the member should apologize for and withdraw the comments that he made, specifically to the Member for Edmonton-South. 2:50

The Speaker: The Deputy Government House Leader.

Mr. Schow: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise and on behalf of the hon. Government House Leader I will apologize for and withdraw those remarks. I would like to say that I think the level of decorum in this Chamber is certainly important, and though I don’t like to play the game tit-for-tat, it is important to recognize that the questions that preceded that statement by the hon. Government House Leader made allegations of a criminal nature against three members of this Chamber. Those are also problems. I am happy, as I have said, to withdraw and apologize, but I would ask, as I suspect you would as well, that all members of this Chamber raise the level of decorum and elevate the level of questions we’re asking. These are questions we ask on behalf of our constituents, who are not able to be here on their own. Thank you for that, Mr. Speaker. I withdraw and apologize.

The Speaker: Well, I’d like to thank the Deputy Government House Leader for withdrawing and apologizing as it certainly was a point of order, and I would highlight that. What I would also like to do is just reiterate some of the comments that I made on April 13 this year, when I noted the importance of freedom of speech to members of this Assembly. Freedom of speech is indeed the most important aspect of parliamentary privilege that we as members enjoy. However, freedom of speech does not come without responsibility. Accordingly, I would urge all members to think about the comments that they make if allegations like this were made of such a highly sensitive nature. On that day I encouraged members against making such remarks, which was why

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it was very clearly a point of order today. We can get on with our job as parliamentarians without making allegations. I would just like to provide some additional caution. While I think there’s significantly more matter of debate around the question that the Member for Edmonton-South raised, certainly accusing members of criminal activity that is not founded does drive us towards these sorts of discussions about the tit-for-tat. That is not to minimize that this very clearly was a point of order, so I accept the apology and appreciate that, but I wanted to take this opportunity to remind all members that while we have absolute impunity with respect to freedom of speech, that doesn’t mean that that speech doesn’t come without significant responsibility. I consider the matter dealt with and concluded. At 2:40 and 2:42 there were additional points of order raised by the Opposition House Leader.

Point of Order Language Creating Disorder

Ms Gray: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Specifically, at that time the member who was speaking at 2:40 referred to the NDP occupation. The terminology “NDP occupation” implies military force being used. It’s wildly inappropriate and, I would suggest, unparliamentary given our democratically elected government at the time. I think that type of language leads to abuse in this place. At 2:42 – my apologies, Mr. Speaker. I do not have the Blues in front of me, and I think I passed you my note that I wrote the terminology down on, but there was a second use of inflammatory terminology that I thought was likely to create disorder within this Chamber, and for this reason I thought the member should apologize and withdraw.

Mr. Schow: A quick point of clarification, Mr. Speaker. Is the hon. Opposition House Leader joining the two points of order or just the first one?

The Speaker: We will handle them in conjunction. I also don’t have the benefit of the Blues because of the timeline in which the point of order was called, but I think that she has made her case with respect to the type of language that she felt was inflammatory. You’re welcome to defend the position or to apologize and withdraw, and we can move on with our lives, whichever you prefer.

Mr. Schow: Well, Mr. Speaker, with regard to the word “occupation” in the first point of order, I’m not going to gratify that. That’s ridiculous. It’s not a point of order. It’s a matter of debate. With regard to the second, I don’t have the benefit of the Blues, but if the members opposite are offended by some of the terminology used on this side of the House and the context in which it’s being used, maybe it’s time to grow tougher skin. This is a difficult business, and frankly I don’t find either of these a point of order. I think it’s a matter of debate, and we should move on to more important things of the day.

The Speaker: I am prepared to rule . . . [interjection] Sure. If you want to talk about the second point of order.

Ms Gray: Simply to put on the record that the point of order was regarding the terminology “NDP drug site,” which I think is very disrespectful to Albertans with addiction issues as well as the sensitive nature of that debate. Thank you.

Mr. Schow: Well, Mr. Speaker, it’s a term I’ve heard used several times in my constituency, especially about the one that was located

in Lethbridge that was shut down after significant criminal activity was found in an in-depth investigation. Again, if the members opposite don’t like the term “NDP drug site,” we don’t like the term “UCP delta wave,” but they tend to use it and continue to use it as though that’s acceptable in this Chamber. I have not called a point of order on that. I recognize that these members may not like “NDP drug site,” but, again, time to grow some tougher skin. Not a point of order but a matter of debate.

The Speaker: I am not convinced that “time to grow tougher skin” is the threshold of a point of order. Nevertheless, I do think that in this case this is a matter of debate. There are lots of things that the government members might say that the opposition members may not like, and on the other side of the coin there are certainly lots of strongly worded, passionate statements that the opposition makes that invoke the same sort of feelings and frustrations in government members. I think it hearkens back to our third point of order today, where freedom of speech is absolutely free but does not come without responsibility. We can consider the words that we use and how they might impact other individuals in the Chamber, but it certainly doesn’t raise it to the level of a point of order. I consider this matter dealt with and concluded. Ordres du jour.

head: Orders of the Day

The Clerk: Government Bills and Orders for third reading, Bill 49, Labour Mobility Act. Hon. Mr. Kenney.

The Speaker: The hon. the Premier, with an assist from the Clerk.

Mr. Kenney: I thank the Clerk for – yes. Mr. Speaker, thank you very much, and through you I’d like to thank the Clerk for being very tactful there.

head: Government Bills and Orders Third Reading

Bill 49 Labour Mobility Act

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to stand to move third reading of Bill 49, the Labour Mobility Act.

[Mr. Milliken in the chair]

I spoke to this important bill at second reading extensively. I promise not to do so at quite such great length today, but I want to thank all members who have participated in the debate over the past month on this important initiative. It is clear, Mr. Speaker, that as Alberta is leading Canada in economic growth and is projected to do so again next year as we see billions upon billions of dollars of new private-sector investment flooding into our economy, as we see the best year ever in our forestry industry, the best year ever in our high-tech industry, the best year ever in our film and television industry, the best year ever in venture capital, as we see massive new investments in petrochemicals, as we see an entire new industry taking root all around us in the hydrogen industry, as we see that and the recovery of commodity prices and so much more, I believe that the greatest economic challenge our province will be facing in the medium term will be skill and labour shortages. We’re already hearing it from every business organization. In the past six weeks or so I and some other ministers have participated in a round of Zoom meetings with almost every major industry group in the province, and that is what they are – if there’s one common

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consensus point, it’s that they are concerned about labour shortages. I guess there’s another commonality. They’re all very happy with having an open-for-business government that is cutting taxes, cutting red tape, promoting investment, and leading the way to economic growth. But we as a province need to be proactive. You know, to use a Gretzky metaphor, we need to skate to where the puck is going, and that economic puck is going towards a workforce challenge for this province. 3:00

Now, I think there’s some good news on the horizon in this respect with population growth. I’m being told by folks in the home-building industry that this is one of their best years on record, and there are so many reasons for that. One of them, Mr. Speaker, is that the cost of living differential between Alberta and many other provinces is now so huge that rational people increasingly are coming back, moving back to Alberta, moving to Alberta. The owner of the largest home-building company in Calgary, and I want the NDP – I just want to give them a bit of a trigger warning. They won’t be happy to hear this because it’s good news, and for them good news is bad news. But the president of the largest home- building company in Calgary told me he estimates that a hundred families a week are moving to Calgary from Ontario alone. They can’t keep inventory in stock. So just as this province – one of the great engines of diversification and growth in the past 40 years has been people, migration, as I always point out. My friend from Fort McMurray there, who was born and raised partly in New Brunswick – and by the way, he stopped for a year on the way at the great Notre Dame college in Wilcox, Saskatchewan to learn a bit of hockey, too. That was a good stop. My friend from Sherwood Park: born and raised in Prince Edward Island. By the way, I was speaking to the Premier yesterday, and he passed on his best. Of course, immigration from around the world. I look at the Associate Minister of Immigration and Multiculturalism, born and raised in Pakistan, came to Canada, to Alberta in the 1970s. It’s folks like these who are so responsible for our growth, our diversification in modern Alberta, and we need more like them to follow in their footsteps, Mr. Speaker. We welcome them all with open arms, but we need to get rid of the barriers to their economic success. Now, that means two things. First of all, for newcomers it means the fairness for newcomers action plan, which the associate minister and the Member for Calgary-North is responsible for. That was partly the Fair Registration Practices Act, but it’s the creation of the fairness for newcomers office of the Department of Labour and Immigration. It’s the mentorship programs that we are creating to provide pathways for immigrant workers, immigrant professionals in Alberta, new Canadians. I’ve asked the minister to look at additional legislation. It’s a 12-point program. It’s also the forthcoming fairness for newcomers summit that I will be hosting to fulfill a platform commitment. You know what we are going to do there, Mr. Speaker? We are going to give a platform, a voice to brilliant, highly educated, and well-experienced foreign professionals to speak to their frustration about how difficult it has been for them to work at their skill level in this country, and we’re also going to give a voice to people like the hon. member and the minister from Calgary-North about their success in applying their foreign-developed skills in the Canadian and the Alberta labour force. But most importantly, we are going to call to account the licensing bodies, the professional organizations and make sure they know that as creatures of this Legislature they have a public duty to the common good to remove any unnecessary barriers, bureaucracy, red tape process delays to the full credentialing

of qualified – qualified – foreign-trained professionals. That’s the critical part of the strategy. Another critical part of the strategy is this bill. It is to remove the barriers for professionals – they just handed me my speech, Mr. Speaker; I don’t think I’ll be using it – to remove the barriers for Canadians to come here from B.C. to Newfoundland and Labrador or, as I look to the Member for Grande Prairie, from perhaps Yukon and her husband from Quebec or the Member for West Yellowhead from Nova Scotia. Wherever Canadians come from, drawn by our prosperity, our high incomes, our entrepreneurial culture, our opportunity, our low cost of living, our high quality of life, whatever brings them here, we want them to get to work right away in their field, and that’s what Bill 49 is all about. I am so excited by this. In my second reading speech I quoted a number of the studies which underscore that the costliest part of interprovincial trade barriers in Canada relates to labour mobility. Labour mobility sounds maybe like a technical economic term. It basically means how friendly policies are to incorporating folks who have developed their skills and experience in a different jurisdiction. When a Nova Scotia dental hygienist – well, you know, there’s a very good example here. The Member for Leduc-Beaumont, who is the government of Alberta’s liaison to the Canadian Armed Forces, knows that one of the priorities of military families when they move here is to be able to get their spouses to work in their fields quickly. The military folks don’t have a choice. They’re told: you’re going to go from Gagetown to CFB Edmonton. You’re going to go from Petawawa – let’s say you’re going to go from Bagotville to Cold Lake. They’ve got to pack up and move with the family, and often the spouse, Mr. Speaker, their husband or wife, comes here and they’re at the back of the line when it comes to getting their credentials recognized. Let’s imagine a family from CFB Greenwood, the Royal Canadian Air Force base in Nova Scotia, which I’ve visited many times. Let’s say a helicopter pilot there gets transferred out to CFB Cold Lake. You know, let’s say her husband is a dentist. Well, right now that Nova Scotia dentist may have to wait for months or even years to go through the process, sometimes go back and retrain in various areas, write more exams and tests, all of which involve cost, and there’s the opportunity cost of forgone income during all of that. Well, we want that dentist to be able to get to work right away. That’s what Bill 49 does. Essentially, to boil it right down, it says clearly, for the first time ever in black and white law, that these 45- some professional regulatory bodies have an obligation to recognize qualifications from other jurisdictions posthaste, and in particular it gives the regulatory bodies a maximum of 15 days to assess the regulation. We give them a little bit of time to receive the application for credentialing. We give them a bit of time to verify it. We’re basically saying to them: you don’t need to do a whole separate analysis. You know what? If you get a toothache in Cape Breton, Mr. Speaker, and you have to go to the dentist, you don’t ask to see whether the dentist is a member of the Alberta college of dentists. You just assume the dentist is at a Canadian standard. If we assume that when we’re travelling, why can’t we assume it for a Nova Scotia dentist in Cold Lake? This says: you’ve got 15 days to validate, to certify that credential. Just get it done. Get it done. This will make Alberta by far the leader in Canada in the elimination of barriers to mobility of skilled people across the country. Here’s the thing. We are doing this unilaterally. I know the NDP doesn’t like that idea because they love protectionism, and they’ve been criticizing us for having unilaterally lifted all of Alberta’s exemptions for procurement, 85 per cent of our exemptions under the Canada free trade agreement. When that was negotiated up in Whitehorse about five years back, it was the then Premier, the now

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Leader of the Opposition who larded up Alberta’s consent with a long list of pointless protectionist regulations, because we know that as a matter of ideology the NDP is always against free trade. But the most important part of free trade is labour mobility. We struck down those barriers unilaterally, and we are doing this unilaterally. Mr. Speaker, should the Legislature, in its wisdom, pass this at third reading and Her Honour grant royal assent, I will immediately be writing the other 12 Premiers of the provinces and territories to share this bill with them, to encourage them to follow Alberta’s leadership to do the same thing in their provinces. Mr. Speaker, I must say that one of the reasons I take particular interest in this is in my capacity as minister of intergovernmental affairs – and that’s really, I believe, partly the department responsible for promoting internal trade – but also because I was the federal minister of employment, and I worked very hard with provinces, again, to try to harmonize professional and trade regulations to improve. There’s more work yet to be done. 3:10

I’ll give you one example: apprenticeships. You know, we have about 50 regulated trades, most of which have apprenticeship programs. A lot of them participate in the national red seal program, a great program. I believe the hon. Minister of Indigenous Relations has a dual-ticket red seal. Is that right? In what?

Mr. Wilson: I’m a carpenter and in home inspections.

Mr. Kenney: He’s so busy he forgot. One of them is that he’s a master carpenter. He’s a builder. He doesn’t tear things down; he builds things up, Mr. Speaker. The red seal trades are a great platform to facilitate mobility, Mr. Speaker, but apprenticeship hours are still not completely portable across Canada. If a Quebecer comes down here and does, let’s say, two years towards a pipefitter ticket, she can’t necessarily take those hours back to Quebec and get them recognized or vice versa, and that’s a terrible waste, a waste of time. It’s just dumb bureaucracy getting in the way of young people investing in their skills. We’ve got to fix that. I’m happy to do that unilaterally. Let’s look into that, whether we can do that unilaterally. Mr. Speaker, right now it’s Bill 49, the Labour Mobility Act. You know, the C.D. Howe Institute did a paper for us, and they estimated that Alberta could gain.

For each 1,000 additional workers that move into Alberta in response to lower migration costs . . .

by which they mean things like these regulations, . . . [we] estimate Alberta’s economy grows by $141 million. And if migration costs fall by 1 percent across the board, [we] estimate gains of nearly $9 billion

for the Alberta economy. Now, I don’t know how much this will lower those costs, but it will bring more people, skilled people here to get to work faster. Good for them, good for the economy, good for today’s Alberta, and good for the long-term future. Mr. Speaker, this is a key part of Alberta’s recovery plan, a bold plan to build, to create jobs, and to diversify by building on our natural strengths, like our energy and agriculture, but also diversifying. Mr. Speaker, I commend this bill to the House. Let’s be bold, as our predecessors have always been in this province. Let’s lead. Let’s not be timid. Let’s not create barriers. Let’s knock them down. Let’s knock those barriers down on the path to prosperity. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Acting Speaker: Thank you, hon. Premier. Are there any members wishing to join debate? I see the hon. Member for Cardston-Siksika has risen.

Mr. Schow: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move that we adjourn debate.

[Motion to adjourn debate carried]

head: Government Motions Equalization Payments 101. Mr. Kenney moved:

Be it resolved that the Legislative Assembly: (a) recognize the results of the referendum held on

October 18, 2021, where 61.7 per cent of voters supported removing section 36(2) of the Constitution Act, 1982, Parliament and the government of Canada’s commitment to the principle of making equalization payments,

(b) reaffirm the principle articulated by the Supreme Court of Canada in its 1998 Quebec secession reference that it is “the constitutional right of each participant in the federation to initiate Constitutional change” and that “this right implies a reciprocal duty on the other participants to engage in discussions to address any legitimate initiative to change the constitutional order,”

(c) authorize Her Excellency the Governor General to issue a proclamation under the Great Seal of Canada amending the Constitution of Canada in accordance with the schedule set forth below, and

(d) direct the government of Alberta to take all necessary steps to secure a fair deal for Alberta in the Canadian federation, including the reform of federal transfer programs, the defence of provincial powers enumerated in the Constitution, and the right to pursue responsible development of natural resources. SCHEDULE AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF CANADA 1. The Constitution Act, 1982 is amended by

repealing section 36(2) thereof. 2. This Amendment may be cited as the Constitution

Amendment, [year of proclamation]. [VERSION FRANÇAISE] MODIFICATION DE LA CONSTITUTION DU CANADA 1. Le paragraphe 36(2) de la Loi constitutionnelle

de 1982 est abrogé. 2. Titre de la présente modification: Modification

constitutionnelle de [l’année de la proclamation]

[Adjourned debate November 17: Mr. Nicolaides]

The Acting Speaker: I see the hon. Member for Cardston-Siksika has risen.

Mr. Schow: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I appreciate the opportunity to rise and speak on this motion. You know, I listened to remarks from a number of members in this Chamber recently about this motion, about equalization, and something I’m drawn to a number of times, that I’ve heard the Member for Red Deer-South refer to, is an equal partnership and a fair partnership and one where members of that partnership feel as though their contributions are being recognized in an equitable manner. Alberta has been a disproportionate contributor to the partnership of the federation for decades. For decades. I ran to be a member of the Legislative Assembly for a number of reasons. I’m sure everybody gets asked this question: why did you run? For first-time candidates they have all this, you know,

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messaging and talking points about issues that they care about, but sometimes it’s the hardest question to answer for candidates. Why are you running? You can hear them spout off sometimes and say: well, I’m doing it to make the province a better place. And I believe them, but for me I ran to defend a province that my ancestors and my neighbours’ ancestors helped built. That matters to me. I have two grandfathers, both of which fought in the Second World War and one of which was a bomber pilot. He flew a Halifax, and he flew missions over Germany. I sometimes reflect on what I was doing at the age of 18 versus what he was doing. The reason why I reference this, Mr. Speaker, is that he was defending a country, coming from a province that he believed was worth fighting for. He believed it. At 18 years old I don’t know what kind of convictions I had. I was pretty focused on playing basketball. I mean, I’ll be very frank. That was my whole world, staying in shape and trying to get an athletic scholarship to go to university. My grandfather Jack Harker at the age of 18 was trying to defend a country, trying to defend democracy. Paul Willis Schow was doing the exact same thing. Mr. Speaker, I bring that up because there are things worth fighting for: a country that respects and honours each other from coast to coast to coast and a country that believes in an equitable partnership. But since that time, when my grandfathers fought World War II to now, I believe that partnership has become strained by the players involved. Sadly, it’s far more political than it should be. We were far more united back then, yet we would see those in certain positions of power seek to divide. Right now we have an opportunity to fight for equality and Confederation. We believed as a government in this so much that we put it back to the people in a referendum this fall, something we had talked about, campaigned on, and put a significant amount of emphasis on. The Premier has spoken a number of times, quite eloquently I might add, about this fairness. Long before the Premier was even elected to the seat where he sits currently, he was fighting for Alberta in opposition and while he was in Ottawa. Mr. Speaker, I want to cite a couple instances where we have seen the complete opposite of that from the hon. Leader of the Official Opposition. There was an opportunity to fight for fairness in this country, and that happened in June of 2018. At the time I was no longer a staffer with the UCP caucus, but I was actively pursuing a nomination. At the time I had probably just won it, in historical fashion I might add, but I digress. The point is that the federal government renewed the equalization formula effectively unilaterally, and it was met with complete and utter silence from the opposition, the government of the day, and I don’t understand why it wasn’t important to the NDP and to the then Premier to fight back. The Member for Calgary-Buffalo and at the time the Finance minister had said: on equalization I’m agnostic; I’m kind of agnostic, I guess, in terms of the transfer payments as they currently are in place. Mr. Speaker, how could you be agnostic about fairness? Like, it’s mind-boggling. How could you stand in this House as a minister of the Crown and be agnostic about the best interests of your own province? It’s shocking. 3:20

Alberta has disproportionally contributed to the rest of the country for decades, and in return we have been met from our unequal partners in the east with hostility to some of our own best interests. For example, if you look at Bill C-69, the so-called no- more-pipelines act, this was introduced in February 2018. Okay, Mr. Speaker. Let’s take it back to that. Where was the now Premier on the day that this was introduced, this bill? Anybody know? Anyone from the opposition know? He was in Ottawa. Why?

Fighting against a bill that would cause irreparable damage to this province. The hon. Premier was elected to defend Alberta and fight for it. Jobs, economy, and pipelines: it’s something that I’ve heard so many times in this Chamber. It’s music to my ears every time. He’s done just that, but even before the Premier was elected, he was fighting for jobs, economy, and pipelines. So let me ask you: on the day that this bill was introduced, where was the hon. Premier of the day? I don’t know. Let’s ask that member, because that member certainly wasn’t in Ottawa, certainly wasn’t fighting for Alberta, and certainly wasn’t fighting for a fair deal for this province. That is what Albertans of the day in 2015 elected that member to do, and that member failed utterly. It wasn’t until October 2018 that the NDP’s ears perked up and realized: hey, people are a little bit upset about this; maybe we should do something about it. So I ask: what was done? The answer again is quite a tepid response: we’re going to have to go and consult some stakeholders. Mr. Speaker, I do not claim to be an expert on energy policy. I don’t claim to be an expert on a whole lot, maybe, besides a zone defence, a man-to-man defence, a couple of other things. I can talk for days. I recognize that consulting stakeholders is important, but reading this Bill C-69 is pretty plain and simple. It is a horrible bill for Alberta, and it was met with silence from the opposition for eight months. Where were they? In fact, the minister of the day had said in October, Minister McCuaig-Boyd, in a written statement that they want to consult key stakeholders. Eight months after the fact. Yeah, I get it. Consult stakeholders and see what it’s going to mean for the province, but you’d think that you might be doing that eight months earlier. With an entire department behind you, who work tirelessly on behalf of the province as well, you might get some briefing or ask for it. Sadly, that minister did not, and it took eight months to have even the weakest of reactions. Mr. Speaker, it is imperative that we as a province continue to fight for what is right, and the sad thing is that the NDP had stated on the matter of equalization that it’s a pointless fight. It’s a pointless fight. Let me ask you a question. Let me ask all members this question. Maybe you can give me a “Hear, hear.” If my house is invaded or my house is under siege and I have no chance of winning that fight because I’m outnumbered 10 to 1, are you just going to sit there? Am I just going to let people come into my house and disrespect my house? Am I just going to lay down and let it happen, or am I going to fight?

Mr. Getson: You die on your feet; better than to lie down.

Mr. Schow: You die on your feet, Mr. Speaker. Thank you, hon. member. I’ll tell you, Mr. Speaker, that I am so tired of the NDP pretending to pick and choose fights that matter to them. They picked all the wrong fights. They picked fights with Albertans as soon as they got elected by introducing the job-killing carbon tax, the single largest tax increase in the history of the province. Meanwhile they failed utterly to pick the right fights with the federal government when the time made itself available. C-69 and equalization are the two things that I’m referring to in this instance. Again, I am confused, and I do believe it would be a waste of time to try to understand the mind of our comrades across the aisle. But some things, I think, should go without saying. It’s worth fighting for Alberta. It’s worth fighting to makes sure that we get a fair deal. Here are some interesting statistics, Mr. Speaker. Since 2015 Alberta has not collected one penny from the equalization system. Meanwhile Quebec has collected over $70 billion. In recent days – and by that I mean in the last year, year and a half – Quebec has actually done moderately well financially. They’ve actually even

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run a couple of surpluses, yet they still collected money from the federal government through the equalization program. I read an article that had said that – they were asked what they were going to do with this surplus. I’ve cited this a couple of times, but what’s shocking is that they said that they were going to use it to pay down the debt, which is understandable, and help reduce parking fees. Help reduce parking fees. Right now I can tell you that $13 billion kept right here in the province of Alberta would go a whole long way to deal with some serious issues that we’re facing and dealing with despite the fact that we have not benefited from the equalization formula in the same way that Quebec has. I have to commend, with the utmost respect, the hon. Associate Minister of Mental Health and Addictions, including the previous Associate Minister of Mental Health and Addictions, for taking concrete steps towards providing more recovery beds for those who are tragically stuck in the cycle of addiction. If the resources were there, Mr. Speaker, I suspect we would put as much into it as possible. We’re doing everything we can to combat this epidemic, opioid epidemic. Think of what we could do with that kind of money in this province. I certainly think that we would spend it much better than the government of Quebec. While I understand that their govern- ments are looking out for their own self-interests – and I can’t condemn them for that – I will say this, Mr. Speaker. The way Alberta has been treated is unfair. Now to the motion. I guess I’ve been speaking on it for a while, but to the substance. On October 18, 61.7 per cent of Albertans voted to remove section 36(2) of the Constitution, which means the government of Alberta will pursue further negotiations with the federal government. That’s Albertans speaking, Mr. Speaker. That is a direct question to Albertans asking what is best, and the opposition opposes it. Why does the opposition, the comrades across the aisle, oppose democracy?

The Acting Speaker: Are there any other members wishing to join debate? I see the hon. Leader of the Official Opposition has risen.

Ms Notley: Well, thank you very much, Mr. Speaker, and thank you for giving me the opportunity to rise to speak to this motion. Let me begin by identifying the fact that what this motion really is is a profound wasted opportunity. Let me start by talking about some of the things about which we agree. I took a little bit of time this afternoon to go through the Premier’s comments from when he spoke to it back on Remembrance Day. There are some elements of it where, as is typically the case, I see what I would characterize as a pretty liberal rewriting of history. Ironic coming from the Premier, i.e. Liberal; that’s what I was trying to do there. Anyway, maybe you didn’t see it. Whatever. Doesn’t matter. A bit of rewriting of history. But at the same time what I did also see were some issues upon which we agree. 3:30

There is no question that the people of Alberta are suffering from a great deal of hardship right now. Quite frankly, that has been the case, off and on, with some relief here and there, certainly since, well, at least beginning in 2015 with the dramatic drop in the price of oil internationally and the consequences that that wreaked on our economy. At that time, with the economic frustration people were experiencing, the long-term friction that often would flare up between Alberta and other parts of Canada came to front of mind again, and for good reason. There are a lot of complicated issues that we are dealing with these days as a country. Albertans were frustrated, and they were frustrated with a number of the things that the Premier himself outlined. Let me say that I was one of those Albertans.

We talk about the fact that, you know, we had the issue of Bill C- 48, the tanker ban. We talk about Bill C-69, the environmental protection act, or the so-called act. We talk about – now, the Premier failed to mention that, in fact, while I was Premier, I advocated against both of those acts and made rather lengthy and repeated submissions to many people, including to many different members of the Senate. The Premier noted that the Senate subsequently made recommendations back to the House of Commons to significantly change both of those bills, to drop one of them and to make significant changes to the other. I’d like to think that part of that came from the fact that we engaged pretty substantially, but what is also true is that the House of Commons did not take the recommendations of the Senate. We have those bills there, and they are, without question, bills that impact our ability to develop our resources here in Alberta. That is something that, you know, we should all be concerned about, because again the Premier is correct. We have a proud history in this province of standing up to ensure that (a) we own the energy resources and (b) that we make the decisions about how they are developed. So when those decisions are impeded upon either by the federal government or by other provinces, it is frustrating and it creates friction. That is a real thing, and it is something that I think leadership in this province, whether it be political leadership at the provincial level, political leadership at the municipal level, other forms of leadership: we are going to be engaged with it for some time. There are, of course, then, those issues, and of course people are also frustrated about the consequences of those problems as they relate and have in the past related to our economy and, quite frankly, their ability to access jobs. That is a thing. I also think that this is going to be something that will continue to be a problem, for instance, as we move into a new area of discussion, the energy transition. We talk about the issue of whether Alberta is at the table to talk about additional emissions caps or conversations about additional emissions caps with the broader oil and gas sector. We should be at the table, and we should be doing everything to make sure that stuff doesn’t happen that runs against our interests. We should be engaging at every possible decision point to make sure that our issues are being heard and that people are responding to them. That is true. What’s also true is that there are genuine problems with the equalization formula that have developed over years. Let me say that in principle I think equalization is a thing which has helped Canada grow, and it is part of our nation. In principle I support equalization, but that doesn’t take away from the fact that over the years the formula has changed and developed in a way that has not helped Alberta and where we have not gotten from that formula what we should have, particularly as we have been confronted by unprecedented economic challenges in the last few years. Let’s talk a little bit about some of those problems. You know, there were two that the Premier mentioned in his speech, and there are two that have been commonly referred to during this conversation. One is the fact that the formula itself ensures that equalization grows year after year after year. Even if we find that the disparity between provinces shrinks, we still have a program that is growing. I think that there is sound reason to question that. The other thing that has been discussed is the fiscal stabilization formula and the fact that there is a cap on what we receive as a result of the fiscal stabilization formula. Those are two important issues. But here’s the thing, Mr. Speaker. It was quite historic, really, a few years ago when we had a Prime Minister from Alberta, and his senior minister for Alberta also happened to be the fellow that is now occupying the Premier’s chair. They had the opportunity to fix those problems, but they didn’t. So the question becomes: why?

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Why didn’t they? Why was it not a problem then, but it’s a problem now? Surely it was clear that the problem existed then, especially for a province like ours that is so clearly subject to such volatile revenue changes. That’s not news, by the way. It wasn’t that somehow in 2015 we woke up and went: “Oh my goodness. You know, our revenues are kind of unpredictable.” That’s been something we’ve known for a very, very long time in this province. There was an opportunity there to fix it, and it didn’t happen. The fact of the matter is that a positive vote on the question that we are asked to talk about now, which is the principle of equalization: it won’t fix any of these issues. It won’t fix C-69. It won’t fix C-48. It won’t fix equalization. It won’t fix those things. Negotiation with the federal government will fix those things. Engaging, lobbying, getting all your stakeholders and your opinion leaders to focus in a strategic way on particular stress points to move the ball from point A to point B in a sophisticated, thought- out, strategic way: that will do it. Showboating like this will not do it, and this referendum certainly will not do that. It is, as I began, a terribly missed opportunity because, as we said when the government first brought this question to the House, if the question had been amended in the way we presented to the House at the time so that we were calling on Albertans to vote on the need to renegotiate the equalization formula to more fairly reflect the factors experienced in Alberta, had that been the principle of the question, you know what? Not only would all of us have voted in favour of the question; we might even have helped campaign in the referendum in order to get a much more substantive and substantial vote in support, and we would be back here right now speaking to why we were unanimously in support to it. It really was a tremendously missed opportunity. Why did we miss that opportunity? Mr. Speaker, as with so many things with this UCP government and this Premier, this wasn’t about a solution. This is about division, and it’s about politics. It’s about insisting upon division and that division is the outcome. I will say that every day we open the newspaper, division certainly is an outcome. Unfortunately, it seems to be much closer to home than the Premier ever expected. Nonetheless, we had an opportunity to send a powerful message to Canada. We did not. Instead, we have this question. What is wrong with this question? Well, first thing, a very simple, simple point: the province of Alberta cannot deliver on the answer to this question. Why do you ask Albertans to vote on something that the province of Alberta on the face of it cannot deliver on? Why? To create anger. To create division. It’s particularly dishonest because the fact is that the province of Alberta cannot deliver on this question. That’s the first reason it’s the wrong question. 3:40

Now, what else makes this a difficult question to actually now vote in favour of or endorse, as we’re being asked to do right now? The Premier said in his comments that a vast number, an enormous number of people, an enormous majority voted in favour of this referendum. In fact, 39 per cent of Albertans cast their ballot for this, and of that 39 per cent 62 per cent said yes. What that means is that 1 in 4 Albertans voted in favour of this. I can’t help but think back to the Quebec referendum, which I will refer to in a little bit more detail in a bit. They had 95 per cent turnout versus 38 per cent turnout. Alberta leaders, for instance, historically have needed at least 77 per cent to keep their job. It turns out that equalization was more popular than the Premier. Nonetheless, the other reason, third reason, why we have a problem with this question as it is currently articulated is that the campaign that this government ran to convince Albertans to vote for the question was itself dishonest because people were told:

“Don’t read the question. It doesn’t mean what it says; it means what I tell you it says. Trust me.” That was the foundation of the campaign that this government delivered to the people of this province as they presented this referendum, this from a Premier with a trust rating of about 20 per cent, the lowest trust rating of any Premier anywhere in the country and arguably, some pollsters tell me, the lowest trust rating ever measured in the history of this province and polling. Sure. What Albertans were asked to vote on is not the question but, rather, what the Premier said the question would mean in the future based on what he said it meant at any given time. It would be grossly irresponsible for us to vote in favour and somehow make that into a real thing. Finally, the Premier himself, of course – as he acknowledged in his comments, there is disagreement on this, so I will articulate the disagreement. The Supreme Court of Canada decision around the Quebec reference does not say what he says it does. If all any provincial government had to do to open constitutional negotiations was to have a referendum where 1 in 4 of their citizens voted in favour of it, we’d have either no constitution left or we’d have no country left, and the federal government would be so tied up at the table, as would all the provincial governments, we’d probably have no health care left and no provincial and public emergency funding left and all the other things because we’d be doing nothing but debating the Constitution. That’s not what’s happened, and the reason that’s not what’s happened is because that Supreme Court of Canada decision does not say what the Premier claims it says. He said, you know: I invite you, I invite everybody to read the decision. I invite the Premier to read the decision, and I invite him to then confer with people who are experts in interpreting Supreme Court of Canada decisions in order to understand why it is that they almost unanimously, with the exception of the Fraser Institute, state very clearly that the Supreme Court of Canada decision does not in any way suggest that there is any obligation for anybody in Ottawa to commence constitutional negotiations as a result of this referendum. However, that is what the Premier of the province told the people of Alberta when he asked them to vote on this. So, again, there was misinformation presented to the people of Alberta. I actually believe it ended up on the Elections Alberta site, which is a whole other issue; there are a lot of things ending up on the Elections Alberta site these days that are somewhat questionable. Nonetheless, in this case it shouldn’t have been there, and Albertans were misinformed on the impact of this referendum when they were asked to cast their ballot on it. So, once again, it would be irresponsible for us to endorse misinforming Albertans and then endorse the outcome of their vote as a result. The other point of this is that even if the Premier’s interpretation of the Supreme Court of Canada decision, that he loves to wax on about so much, was accurate, it still wouldn’t apply in this case because there was no clear question. Again, witness the fact that they told everybody in their talking points not to read the question, and two, there’s not a clear majority because only 1 in 4 Albertans actually voted in favour of it. So then the question becomes: why did the Premier and his cabinet and this UCP caucus and this UCP government go through the process that they did? I would argue: politics, clear and simple. Now, on this side of the House our objective, whether in opposition or whether it is in government, is to do everything we can to make life better for Alberta families, and by doing that, I mean a broad range of things. We need to grow the economy, we need to create jobs, we need to diversify the economy, we need to retain and attract young people, we need to build safe and resilient communities, and we need to be there for one another when we need each other’s help, like, for instance, with our health care system.

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These are the fundamental core tenets of what we do in government. That is what we should be doing. This referendum won’t achieve any of those outcomes. It’s not going to create jobs. I mean, maybe another couple of lawyers will take another run at writing another couple of opinions, and God knows that that is the one sector that’s getting a lot of work out of this government these days. However, in the long term it’s not going to create jobs; quite the opposite. If people took the Premier at his word, it’s actually going to create uncertainty, it’s going to sow division, and it is going to push investment away from this province because it is yet another chapter in the long-running soap opera that has been this UCP government’s record since day one. I find it ironic that we’re talking about throwing out the principle of equalization in the very year that this government reached a particularly tragic milestone. For 55 years, since 1965, under the Socreds, under the PCs, under the NDP, under three separate governments on any side of the political spectrum, Alberta was a net contributor to Confederation, but in 2020, under the leadership of this UCP government, this government oversaw Alberta becoming a net recipient, the first time in 55 years. It’s very ironic that as soon as we get that news, they ask us to vote on a referendum eliminating the principle of equalization. Good Lord. Anyway, that was what they achieved, 55 years. That’s not even including the money that’s been left on the table that in a fit of pique this government continues to refuse to actually accept. That’s just the money that was delivered in 2020. Here’s the thing. If the referendum had in any way, shape, or form been designed to pursue the things that I just identified – growing the economy, diversifying the economy, creating jobs, improving our health care, attracting young people to Alberta, building stronger, more resilient communities – if it had been designed to achieve any of those things, we would have been voting for it. But it is not achieving any of those things. Fixing the long list of problems that the Premier rightly identified at the outset of his comments, many of which I acknowledge are correct, which I do believe require attention, is hard work. It’s not glamorous work. The fact that we still have a pipeline under construction going to tidewater for the first time also in almost 50 years: trust me; that was the product of very hard work. That’s what hard work looks like, not this showboating. Actually rolling up your sleeves, doing your research, getting down to work, finding every possible point of influence you can, influencing the influencers, doing it day in, day out, night after night: that’s how you get your point across. That’s not what this is. In the end, people in Alberta want their government to be a workhorse, not a show horse. This referendum is about being a show horse. It’s not about doing the hard work. 3:50

Why is that? Because ultimately this Premier doesn’t even really want the win. What he wants is division. This is designed to fail because what he’s really looking for is someone to blame his problems on, another mechanism to distract from the fact that they have failed on practically every single promise they made to Albertans when they ran to be in office in 2019. No pipeline but $1.5 billion lost. Jobs? We’re still down about 60,000 from the day they got elected. Economy? Also still down from the day they got elected. It’s not working. They’re hoping that they can make this about blaming the federal government for all of it. There’s hard work to be done, and by all means Albertans need their provincial government to be there for them to get the best deal they can out of Ottawa. This is not that, and unfortunately it is not going to help them on their way to Ottawa in any way, shape, or form.

Albertans need a thoughtful, engaged, relentless effort to have our interests heard. Unfortunately, what we’re being asked to vote on today is instead part of an ineffective and dishonest, lazy strategy designed to focus only on politics. It is a distraction from the work that the government should be doing on the part of the people of this province. It is not about developing good public policy and securing good outcomes for the people of this province. It is about crass, self-interested politics. That is what most of what comes out of this Executive Council has been about since day one. It could have been a motion that we all voted on unanimously. It could have been a referendum that we campaigned together on. It could have been a question that was designed to answer the problems that Albertans have genuinely experienced. Instead, it’s a paper tiger, and it doesn’t do what it was designed to do. Albertans can see through it. Alberta will see through it. Really, I wish we were taking more time to talk about creating jobs, diversifying the economy, dealing with the 15,000-plus surgical backlog, fixing the curriculum, attracting young people back to the province, building our postsecondary, ensuring that more people have access to it, growing the tech sector faster than the rest of the country instead of slowing it, and building a strong future towards a healthy energy transition where all Albertans are part of a secure, prosperous, sustainable economy. Those are the kinds of big-picture things we should be working on in here. Instead, we are not. As a result and because of the many challenges around this question and the disconnect between what it says and what Albertans were told and what the actual outcome is, we can’t possibly, unfortunately, support it under these circumstances. Should the Premier wish to try again to bring a more realistic, fact- based question that supports the people of this province to the Legislature, we would be happy to support that. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

The Acting Speaker: Thank you, hon. opposition leader. Are there any other members wishing to join debate? [interjection] Having spoken, there will be an opportunity to close, absolutely. However, should there be any other MLAs looking to join? Seeing none, the hon. Premier with an opportunity to close debate.

Mr. Kenney: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker, for the opportunity to close debate on this historic motion. If the House, in its wisdom, sees fit to adopt this resolution, it will trigger the formal beginning of a constitutional amendment process instructed by the democratic wishes of the people of Alberta, wherein 642,000 people voted last month, 62 per cent of electors, to amend section 36 of the Constitution with respect to the principle of equalization. This is a critical moment in our history as we unite to fight for a fair deal in the Canadian federation. As I said in my speech at the introduction of this motion, Alberta is the most Canadian province, reflected by the hundreds of thousands of Canadians who are Albertans by choice and not chance, by the deep and abiding patriotism of this province, and indeed by the pride that we have taken in sharing much of our good fortune with our neighbours in the rest of the Canada when times were good here and not so good elsewhere. In that spirit, let me say, Mr. Speaker, that our hearts go out to our friends, neighbours, and family to the west of us in British Columbia as they cope with the devastating effects of the recent storms, the flooding, and damage to infrastructure. I’ve spoken on three occasions with the Premier of British Columbia, offering Alberta’s assistance, over the past three days. I know that all Albertans share that concern and that moral support and sense of

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solidarity for our fellow British Columbians, just as we appreciate the strengths of this federation, the opportunity that allows us to be stronger together, united. Mr. Speaker, none of that can allow us to turn our attention away from the fundamental sense of unfairness and alienation that has long abided here in Alberta. It is incumbent upon us as leaders, as elected representatives not to hide from it, not to dodge it, not to wish it away, but to address it in constructive ways. That is precisely what the referendum on equalization was about. Now, allow me a moment to respond to some of the false claims made by the hon. the Leader of the Opposition in her remarks just now. First of all, Mr. Speaker, she referred to this referendum as “showboating.” In point of fact, the holding of this referendum was the fulfillment of a core commitment made to the people of Alberta. When I sought the leadership of the United Conservative Party, it was in part based on the concept of holding a referendum on equalization to maximize Alberta’s leverage within the Canadian federation, in a sense to take a page out of Quebec’s very successful playbook, which has allowed it to dominate the politics of the federation for the past five decades, but to do it in a way that was still loyal to a united Canada, as this party was from its foundation. I ran on that. That commitment found its way into the UCP election platform. Then, indeed, we went further to consult directly with Albertans through the Fair Deal Panel, chaired by a highly respected Albertan, a former deputy minister of western economic diversification and a former deputy minister of Intergovernmental Relations to Premier Peter Lougheed, Oryssia Lennie. I want to thank her and her group, the panel, for their work but also in which they confirmed the wisdom of the referendum and proposed specific wording for the question that went to Albertans. The Leader of the Opposition claimed that the Harper government failed to reform equalization. Mr. Speaker, in fact, there were important changes made under Prime Minister Harper’s government. She may recall that the Premier of Newfoundland at the time took the Canadian flag down to half-mast to protest some of those changes, changes which reduced by about a billion dollars a year Quebec’s entitlement to equalization payments. There was a context, Mr. Speaker. That was at a time of an all- time low of western and Alberta alienation. The Leader of the Opposition claimed that this referendum has been designed to divide Albertans. In point of fact, I cannot remember a time in my life or in modern Canadian political history when the country was more united than under Prime Minister Harper’s government, when support for separation in Quebec was at its lowest level ever and western alienation was at its lowest level ever. We didn’t have Albertans talking about separation when there was a Prime Minister and a government that respected this province, that allowed it to develop its resources, that championed those resources and those resource workers, that adopted policies that supported this province’s growth. Indeed, there was no Alberta government at the time calling for equalization reform because of that. Changes were made even though the Alberta government was not advocating for changes and even though the government of Canada was facilitating rather than impeding the economic growth of this province. 4:00

Now, further, the Leader of the Opposition dismissed the 62 per cent vote in favour of this referendum. Now, it is true that election turnout concurrent with municipal elections is generally lower than in provincial or federal elections. I’m not allowed to note anybody’s absence here, but that says a lot. I would remind the NDP leader that when she won a majority government, in 2015, it was with 604,000 votes. That was characterized as, quote, a landslide by the

media, a landslide victory. So 604,000 votes. Guess what? Mr. Speaker, 642,000 Albertans voted for change in equalization and for a fair deal for Alberta in this referendum. If they were elected on a landslide, then that’s a mega landslide. What did she say? She said that only 32 per cent of the total population voted yes for equalization. Then are they suggesting that when only 28 per cent of Albertans voted for their government, somehow their majority mandate, through which they exercised total powers for four years, was somehow diminished or illegitimate? How ridiculous. She further claims that I have not read the Quebec secession reference. Of course I have. Clearly, she did not read my speech in the introduction of this motion, in which I acknowledged that for greater certainty it is necessary for this Assembly to formalize the commencement of a constitutional amendment process through a resolution passed by this House. Since she didn’t do so, allow me, Mr. Speaker, to quote into the record from the Quebec secession reference of the Supreme Court of Canada from 1998 at paragraph 88. [interjections] Instead of heckling, I invite the members of the opposition to learn something about the Constitution as I cite this. If they don’t respect me, I hope they’ll respect the Supreme Court of Canada.

The amendment of the Constitution begins with a political process undertaken pursuant to the Constitution itself. In Canada, the initiative for constitutional amendment is the responsibility of democratically elected representatives of the participants in Confederation. Those representatives . . .

That’s us, Mr. Speaker. . . . may, of course, take their cue from a referendum, but in legal terms, constitution-making in Canada, as in many [other] countries, is undertaken by the democratically elected representatives of the people. The corollary of a legitimate attempt by one participant in Confederation to seek an amendment to the Constitution is an obligation on all parties to come to the negotiating table.

Mr. Speaker, as I cited from – they don’t think 62 per cent was a clear majority, but apparently their 40 per cent, that brought them to power, was a landslide majority. An absolutely clear question and a clear majority: this would meet the standards of the federal Clarity Act, adopted by the Chrétien government. When I just quoted the Supreme Court, the Supreme Court is saying that if the Legislature adopts a resolution that effectively ratifies or formalizes the effect of the referendum, we then trigger the amendment process and – and – the government of Canada has an obligation to come to the table, something that that government never did, Mr. Speaker, because when Prime Minister Trudeau would say to the NDP government, “Jump,” they would say, “How high, sir?” You know, in fact, they were pleading with that government. We heard this homily just now from the NDP leader about resource development, about energy transition. But their caucus, including, I believe, the member who’s heckling incessantly, was in front of this place with Greta Thunberg a year ago at a rally organized by Extinction Rebellion and 350.org Canada. You know, the manifesto that the NDP caucus endorsed by their presence at their event is opposition not just to all oil and gas extraction, opposition to all current and future proposed pipelines but indeed opposition to liquefied natural gas, which can reduce emissions globally, opposition to carbon capture, utilization, and storage, opposition to hydrogen, specifically blue hydrogen, which is the biggest emerging industry in this province. The antiscience know-nothings of the NDP out front with Extinction Rebellion, now claiming to be champions of Alberta’s energy industry: Mr. Speaker, Albertans don’t buy it, which is why they were the first government in Alberta history to be defeated after one election.

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Now, we heard the Leader of the Opposition say that this govern- ment has pushed investment away from the province. Mr. Speaker, some $80 billion of investment fled Alberta under the disastrous economic record of the NDP. What we now see, I mean, every week – every week – is billions of dollars of new investment returning to this province, not despite our fight for a fair deal but because, in part, I believe businesses want to operate in a jurisdiction that creates a pro-investment environment. Yes, that does mean standing up for our culture of enterprise, standing up for responsible resource development. That means challenging the unconstitutional federal intrusion into section 92A, in our exclusive authority to regulate the development of our resources. Finally, she said that last year was this tragic year in that it was the first year that Alberta was a net beneficiary of the federation. I know the NDP. Economics and mathematics are not the strong point for the NDP, so let me share some basic facts here. Last year the federal government borrowed $653 billion, which means that every single province, 10 for 10, was a net beneficiary of federal spending because the $653 billion represents postponed or future taxes. Of course, we were net beneficiaries. When the federal government goes into the bond markets to fund $653 billion, it’s not coming from the largesse of Ottawa; it’s coming from future Alberta taxpayers. [interjections] Mr. Speaker, I would encourage the opposition, instead of heckling and showing disrespect for this place, to go and read a thoughtful article by a professor . . . [interjections]

The Acting Speaker: Hon. members, I hesitate to interrupt the hon. Premier. Everybody enjoys a good heckle in this place. However, when it is constant, it becomes very difficult for the Speaker to effectively listen to the debate in the House. So I would advise that if people are going to be having conversations or things of that nature, you can do so in the lounges to the side. If the hon. Premier could please continue, with about two minutes remaining.

Mr. Kenney: Mr. Speaker, $653 billion of federal borrowing represents deferred taxes, and as Professor Mintz points out today, based on the research of professor emeritus of economics Robert Mansell, the great genius of tracking the transfers within fiscal federalism, the deferred taxes of that deficit will be repaid most heavily by Albertans. So we are paying for that enormous federal largesse of the past year. Let me conclude, Mr. Speaker, by imploring members of this House to be democrats first and foremost, to listen to the people of Alberta, to take our marching orders from the hundreds of thousands of Albertans who went out to polling stations to direct us to fight for a fair deal on this referendum. In so doing, the government of Alberta will be empowered to immediately seek negotiations with the government of Canada, yes, on the principle

of equalization but more deeply on the broader issue of Alberta’s unfair treatment in the Canadian federation, to seek policies that allow us to develop the resources that we share through equalization and other federal transfers. Ultimately, that’s what this is about. This is not about shutting Alberta off. It’s not about dividing. It’s not about a small Alberta. It’s about Alberta as a proud and essential part of a dynamic and prosperous Canada. It’s about that Alberta being able in the future to play the great role that it has throughout Canada’s modern economic history as the key engine of our country’s prosperity. But to play that role, we need to be able to develop our economy. To develop our economy, we need to be able to develop our resources. This is a clear and powerful message to the government of Canada and our fellow Canadians. I therefore implore the House to vote in favour of the motion. [The voice vote indicated that Government Motion 101 carried]

[Several members rose calling for a division. The division bell was rung at 4:10 p.m.]

[Fifteen minutes having elapsed, the Assembly divided]

[Mr. Milliken in the chair]

For the motion: Allard Long Singh Amery Nally Smith Armstrong-Homeniuk Neudorf Stephan Dreeshen Nicolaides Toews Fir Pon Toor Getson Rowswell Turton Hanson Schow van Dijken Hunter Schulz Walker Issik Schweitzer Wilson Jones Shandro Yao Kenney Sigurdson, R.J. Yaseen

Against the motion: Dang Pancholi Schmidt Irwin Renaud Sigurdson, L.

Totals: For – 33 Against – 6

[Government Motion 101 carried]

The Acting Speaker: I see the hon. Deputy Government House Leader has risen.

Mr. Schow: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move that the Assembly adjourn until 1:30 p.m. Monday, November 22, 2021.

[Motion carried; the Assembly adjourned at 4:28 p.m.]

6302 Alberta Hansard November 18, 2021

_________________________________________________________Bill Status Report for the 30th Legislature - 2nd Session (2020-2021)

Activity to Thursday, November 18, 2021

The Bill sponsor's name is in brackets following the Bill title. If it is a money Bill, ($) will appear between the title and the sponsor's name. Numbers following each Reading refer to Hansard pages where the text of debates is found; dates for each Reading are in brackets following the page numbers. Bills numbered 1 to 200 are Government Bills. Bills numbered 201 or higher are Private Members' Public Bills. Bills numbered with a "Pr" prefix are Private Bills.

* An asterisk beside a Bill number indicates an amendment was passed to that Bill; the Committee line shows the precise date of the amendment.

The date a Bill comes into force is indicated in square brackets after the date of Royal Assent. If a Bill comes into force "on proclamation," "with exceptions," or "on various dates," please contact Legislative Counsel, Alberta Justice, for details at 780.427.2217. The chapter number assigned to the Bill is entered immediately following the date the Bill comes into force. SA indicates Statutes of Alberta; this is followed by the year in which it is included in the statutes, and its chapter number. Please note, Private Bills are not assigned chapter number until the conclusion of the Fall Sittings.

Bill 1 — Critical Infrastructure Defence Act (Kenney) First Reading — 4 (Feb. 25, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 12-18 (Feb. 26, 2020 morn.), 96-98 (Mar. 2, 2020 aft.), 791-98 (May 27, 2020 morn., passed) Committee of the Whole — 859-91 (May 28, 2020 morn., passed) Third Reading — 861-69 (May 28, 2020 morn., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 17, 2020; SA 2020 cC-32.7 ]

Bill 2* — Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Amendment Act, 2020 (Hunter) First Reading — 30 (Feb. 26, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 857-58 (May 28, 2020 morn.), 1004-09 (Jun. 2, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1238-44 (Jun. 9, 2020 eve., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 1364-70 (Jun. 15, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 17, 2020; SA 2020 c9 ]

Bill 3 — Mobile Home Sites Tenancies Amendment Act, 2020 (Glubish) First Reading — 30 (Feb. 26, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 431-46 (Apr. 7, 2020 morn.), 458-65 (Apr. 7, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 465-76 (Apr. 7, 2020 aft.), 477-507 (Apr. 7, 2020 eve.), 572-83 (Apr. 8, 2020 eve.), 659-66 (May 6, 2020 morn., passed)

Third Reading — 703-09 (May 7, 2020 morn., passed) Royal Assent — (May 12, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 c8 ]

Bill 4 — Fiscal Planning and Transparency (Fixed Budget Period) Amendment Act, 2020 (Toews) First Reading — 62 (Feb. 27, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 858 (May 28, 2020 morn.), 869-75 (May 28, 2020 morn.), 933-35 (Jun. 1, 2020 aft.), 970-72 (Jun. 1, 2020 eve.), 1040-43 (Jun. 2, 2020 eve.), 1077 (Jun. 3, 2020 aft., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 1257-66 (Jun. 10, 2020 aft.), 1311-16 (Jun. 11, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 1442 (Jun. 17, 2020 aft.), 1452-55 (Jun. 17, 2020 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 26, 2020; SA 2020 c14 ]

Bill 5 — Fiscal Measures and Taxation Act, 2020 (Toews) First Reading — 110 (Mar. 3, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 224-32 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft., passed on division), 222-23 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft.) Committee of the Whole — 232-33 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft.), 234-41 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 241 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft.), 242-48 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Mar. 20, 2020 outside of House Sitting) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2020 c3 ]

Bill 6 — Appropriation Act, 2020 ($) (Toews) First Reading — 215 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 216-22 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft., passed on division) Committee of the Whole — 222 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft., deemed passed on division) Third Reading — 222 (Mar. 17, 2020 aft., deemed passed on division) Royal Assent — (Mar. 20, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force March 20, 2020; SA 2020 c1 ]

Bill 7 — Responsible Energy Development Amendment Act, 2020 (Savage) First Reading — 827 (May 27, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 858-59 (May 28, 2020 morn.), 891-99 (May 28, 2020 aft.), 972-76 (Jun. 1, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1266-72 (Jun. 10, 2020 aft.), 1370-75 (Jun. 15, 2020 eve.), 1406-11 (Jun. 16, 2020 aft.), 1413 (Jun. 16, 2020 eve.), 1479-81 (Jun. 17, 2020 eve.), 1539-40 (Jun. 22, 2020 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 1636-37 (Jun. 24, 2020 aft., adjourned), 1678-79 (Jun. 25, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 26, 2020; SA 2020 c16 ]

Bill 8* — Protecting Survivors of Human Trafficking Act (Schweitzer) First Reading — 431 (Apr. 7, 2020 morn., passed) Second Reading — 509-21 (Apr. 8, 2020 morn.), 551-58 (Apr. 8, 2020 aft.), 559-72 (Apr. 8, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 593-618 (Apr. 8, 2020 eve.), 671-73 (May 6, 2020 morn., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 709-12 (May 7, 2020 morn., passed) Royal Assent — (May 12, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force May 12, 2020, except Part 2, which comes into force on July 1, 2020; SA 2020 cP-26.87 ]

Bill 9 — Emergency Management Amendment Act, 2020 (Madu) First Reading — 276 (Mar. 20, 2020 morn., passed) Second Reading — 277-80 (Mar. 20, 2020 morn., passed) Committee of the Whole — 280-82 (Mar. 20, 2020 morn., passed) Third Reading — 282-83 (Mar. 20, 2020 morn., passed) Royal Assent — (Mar. 20, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force March 20, 2020; SA 2020 c2 ]

Bill 10 — Public Health (Emergency Powers) Amendment Act, 2020 (Shandro) First Reading — 296-97 (Mar. 31, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 307-20 (Apr. 1, 2020 morn.), 337-44 (Apr. 1, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 354-57 (Apr. 1, 2020 aft.), 407-09 (Apr. 2, 2020 morn.), 426-28 (Apr. 2, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 428-29 (Apr. 2, 2020 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Apr. 2, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force April 2, 2020; certain sections took effect on earlier dates; SA 2020 c5 ]

Bill 11 — Tenancies Statutes (Emergency Provisions) Amendment Act, 2020 (Glubish) First Reading — 297 (Mar. 31, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 298-301 (Mar. 31, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 301-03 (Mar. 31, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 303-05 (Mar. 31, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Apr. 2, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2020 c6 ]

Bill 12 — Liabilities Management Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Savage) First Reading — 297 (Mar. 31, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 320-25 (Apr. 1, 2020 morn.), 344-49 (Apr. 1, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 350-54 (Apr. 1, 2020 aft.), 401-05 (Apr. 2, 2020 morn., passed) Third Reading — 406 (Apr. 2, 2020 morn., passed) Royal Assent — (Apr. 2, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 c4 ]

Bill 13 — Emergency Management Amendment Act, 2020 (No. 2) (Madu) First Reading — 431 (Apr. 7, 2020 morn., passed) Second Reading — 521-26 (Apr. 8, 2020 morn.), 537-51 (Apr. 8, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 583-93 (Apr. 8, 2020 eve.), 619-35 (Apr. 9, 2020 morn.), 648-57 (Apr. 9, 2020 aft.), 673-74 (May 6, 2020 morn.), 688-99 (May 6, 2020 aft., passed)

Third Reading — 699-701 (May 6, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (May 12, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force May 12, 2020, with exceptions; SA 2020 c7 ]

Bill 14 — Utility Payment Deferral Program Act (Nally) First Reading — 687 (May 6, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 724-45 (May 7, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 758-86 (May 8, 2020 morn., passed) Third Reading — 786-90 (May 8, 2020 morn., passed on division) Royal Assent — (May 12, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force May 12, 2020, with certain provisions having effect as of March 18, 2020; SA 2020 cU-4 ]

Bill 15 — Choice in Education Act, 2020 (LaGrange) First Reading — 887-88 (May 28, 2020 aft, passed) Second Reading — 937-54 (Jun. 1, 2020 eve.), 1011-40 (Jun. 2, 2020 eve.), 1058-67 (Jun. 3, 2020 aft.), 1228-38 (Jun. 9, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1375-78 (Jun. 15, 2020 eve.), 1470-79 (Jun. 17, 2020 eve.), 1541-51 (Jun. 22, 2020 eve.), 1575-88 (Jun. 23, 2020 aft.), 1620-25 (Jun. 24, 2020 aft.), 1639-47 (Jun. 24, 2020 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 1657-59 (Jun. 24, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force September 1, 2020; SA 2020 c11 ]

Bill 16 — Victims of Crime (Strengthening Public Safety) Amendment Act, 2020 (Schweitzer) First Reading — 888 (May 28, 2020 aft, passed) Second Reading — 954-70 (Jun. 1, 2020 eve.), 1109-12 (Jun. 3, 2020 eve.), 1127-35 (Jun. 4, 2020 aft.), 1179-81 (Jun. 8, 2020 eve.), 1209-22 (Jun. 9, 2020 aft.), 1285-96 (Jun. 10, 2020 eve., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 1428-29 (Jun. 16, 2020 eve.), 1455-59 (Jun. 17, 2020 aft.), 1551-55 (Jun. 22, 2020 eve.), 1588-90 (Jun. 23, 2020 aft.), 1647-50 (Jun. 24, 2020 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 1676-78 (Jun. 25, 2020 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 26, 2020, with exceptions; SA 2020 c18 ]

Bill 17 — Mental Health Amendment Act, 2020 (Shandro) First Reading — 1125 (Jun. 4, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1203-09 (Jun. 9, 2020 aft.), 1272-74 (Jun. 10, 2020 aft.), 1316-23 (Jun. 11, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1396-1406 (Jun. 16, 2020 aft.), 1413 (Jun. 16, 2020 eve.), 1461-70 (Jun. 17, 2020 eve.), 1605-08 (Jun. 23, 2020 eve.), 1630-36 (Jun. 24, 2020 aft.), 1650-54 (Jun. 24, 2020 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 1675-76 (Jun. 25, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation, with exceptions; certain sections come into force on June 26, 2020; SA 2020 c15 ]

Bill 18 — Corrections (Alberta Parole Board) Amendment Act, 2020 (Schweitzer) First Reading — 912 (Jun. 1, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 989-1004 (Jun. 2, 2020 aft.), 1011 (Jun. 2, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1413-24 (Jun. 16, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 1655 (Jun. 24, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 c12 ]

Bill 19 — Tobacco and Smoking Reduction Amendment Act, 2020 (Shandro) First Reading — 989 (Jun. 2, 2020 aft, passed) Second Reading — 1079-98 (Jun. 3, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1424-28 (Jun. 16, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 1495-97 (Jun. 18, 2020 aft.), 1555-56 (Jun. 22, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 c17 ]

Bill 20 — Real Estate Amendment Act, 2020 (Glubish) First Reading — 1057 (Jun. 3, 2020 aft, passed) Second Reading — 1125-27 (Jun. 4, 2020 aft.), 1169-79 (Jun. 8, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1185-90 (Jun. 8, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 1279-85 (Jun. 10, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 c10 ]

Bill 21* — Provincial Administrative Penalties Act (Schweitzer) First Reading — 1125 (Jun. 4, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1181-85 (Jun. 8, 2020 eve.), 1296-97 (Jun. 10, 2020 eve.), 1355-57 (Jun. 15, 2020 aft.), 1442-52 (Jun. 17, 2020 aft.), 1819-22 (Jul. 8, 2020 morn., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 1983-99 (Jul. 14, 2020 aft.), 2071-74 (Jul. 15, 2020 eve., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 2264-68 (Jul. 21, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force on proclamation, with exceptions; SA 2020 cP-30.8 ]

Bill 22 — Red Tape Reduction Implementation Act, 2020 (Hunter) First Reading — 1301-02 (Jun. 11, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1591-95 (Jun. 23, 2020 eve.), 1655-57 (Jun. 24, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1798-1804 (Jul. 7, 2020 eve.), 1879 (Jul. 8, 2020 eve.), 1939-57 (Jul. 13, 2020 eve.), 1965-66 (Jul. 13, 2020 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 2050-51 (Jul. 15, 2020 aft.), 2053-59 (Jul. 15, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2020 c25 ]

Bill 23* — Commercial Tenancies Protection Act (Fir) First Reading — 1392 (Jun. 16, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1529-35 (Jun. 22, 2020 aft.), 1601-05 (Jun. 23, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1879-80 (Jul. 8, 2020 eve., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 2181-83 (Jul. 20, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force July 23, 2020, with certain sections taking effect March 17, 2020; SA 2020 cC-19.5 ]

Bill 24 — COVID-19 Pandemic Response Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Shandro) First Reading — 1494 (Jun. 18, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1537-39 (Jun. 22, 2020 eve.), 1569-75 (Jun. 23, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1625-30 (Jun. 24, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 1679-81 (Jun. 25, 2020 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 26, 2020, with certain sections taking effect on earlier dates; SA 2020 c13 ]

Bill 25 — Protecting Alberta Industry From Theft Act, 2020 (Schweitzer) First Reading — 1494 (Jun. 18, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1719-35 (Jul. 6, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1804-05 (Jul. 7, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 1904-05 (Jul. 9, 2020 aft.), 2031-32 (Jul. 14, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2020 c24 ]

Bill 26 — Constitutional Referendum Amendment Act, 2020 (Schweitzer) First Reading — 1568 (Jun. 23, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1735-41 (Jul. 6, 2020 eve.), 1764-72 (Jul. 7, 2020 aft.), 1845-56 (Jul. 8, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1964-65 (Jul. 13, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 2081-86 (Jul. 15, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force July 23, 2020; SA 2020 c20 ]

Bill 27 — Alberta Senate Election Amendment Act, 2020 (Schweitzer) First Reading — 1568 (Jun. 23, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1741-47 (Jul. 6, 2020 eve.), 1772-79 (Jul. 7, 2020 aft.), 1822-27 (Jul. 8, 2020 morn.), 1899-1904 (Jul. 9, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1999-2001 (Jul. 14, 2020 aft.), 2074-76 (Jul. 15, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 2076-81 (Jul. 15, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force July 23, 2020; SA 2020 c19 ]

Bill 28 — Vital Statistics (Protecting Albertans from Convicted Sex Offenders) Amendment Act, 2020 (Glubish) First Reading — 1619 (Jun. 24, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1704-17 (Jul. 6, 2020 aft.), 1779-82 (Jul. 7, 2020 aft.), 1856-60 (Jul. 8, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1880-82 (Jul. 8, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 1896-99 (Jul. 9, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force July 23, 2020; SA 2020 c26 ]

Bill 29 — Local Authorities Election Amendment Act, 2020 (Madu) First Reading — 1619-20 (Jun. 24, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1784-97 (Jul. 7, 2020 eve.), 1962-63 (Jul. 13, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 2163-81 (Jul. 20, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 2239-64 (Jul. 21, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force September 1, 2020; SA 2020 c22 ]

Bill 30* — Health Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Shandro) First Reading — 1695 (Jul. 6, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1783-84 (Jul. 7, 2020 eve.), 2032-37 (Jul. 14, 2020 eve.), 2086-2103 (Jul. 15, 2020 eve), 2189-97 (Jul. 20, 2020 eve.), 2210-27 (Jul. 21, 2020 aft.), 2289-96 (Jul. 22, 2020 aft.), 2313-28 (Jul. 22, 2020 eve.), 2360-61 (Jul. 23, 2020 aft., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 2432-475 (Jul. 27, 2020 eve.), 2512-20 (Jul. 28, 2020 aft.), 2523-31 (Jul. 28, 2020 eve., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 2539-61 (Jul. 28, 2020 eve.), 2562-69 (Jul. 28, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jul. 29, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force July 29, 2020, with exceptions; SA 2020 c27 ]

Bill 31 — Environmental Protection Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Nixon, JJ) First Reading — 1760 (Jul. 7, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1878 (Jul. 8, 2020 eve.), 2023-31 (Jul. 14, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 2233-39 (Jul. 21, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 2309-12 (Jul. 22, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force July 23, 2020; SA 2020 c21 ]

Bill 32 — Restoring Balance in Alberta’s Workplaces Act, 2020 (Copping) First Reading — 1760 (Jul. 7, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1861-63 (Jul. 8, 2020 eve.), 2003-23 (Jul. 14, 2020 eve.), 2051-53 (Jul. 15, 2020 aft.), 2059-69 (Jul. 15, 2020 aft.), 2147-62 (Jul. 20, 2020 aft.), 2268-73 (Jul. 21, 2020 eve.), 2296-307 (Jul. 22, 2020 aft.), 2328-40 (Jul. 22, 2020 eve.), 2361-63 (Jul. 23, 2020 aft., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 2404-32 (Jul. 27, 2020 eve.), 2475-85 (Jul. 27, 2020 eve.), 2502-12 (Jul. 28, 2020 aft.), 2531-39 (Jul. 28, 2020 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 2569-78 (Jul. 28, 2020 eve.), 2579-86 (Jul. 28, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jul. 29, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2020 c28 ]

Bill 33* — Alberta Investment Attraction Act (Fir) First Reading — 1760-61 (Jul. 7, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1807-19 (Jul. 8, 2020 morn.), 1927-37 (Jul. 13, 2020 aft.), 2117-27 (Jul. 16, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 2227-31 (Jul. 21, 2020 aft.), 2233 (Jul. 21, 2020 eve.), 2340-44 (Jul. 22, 2020 eve..), 2312-13 (Jul. 22, 2020 eve.), 2363-65 (Jul. 23, 2020 aft., passed with amendments)

Third Reading — 2401-04 (Jul. 27, 2020 eve.), 2485-88 (Jul. 27, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jul. 29, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 cA-26.4 ]

Bill 34 — Miscellaneous Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Nixon, JJ) First Reading — 1839 (Jul. 8, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 1966-69 (Jul. 13, 2020 eve.), 2116-17 (Jul. 16, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 2117 (Jul. 16, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 2312 (Jul. 22, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jul. 23, 2020 aft.) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2020 c23 ]

Bill 35 — Tax Statutes (Creating Jobs and Driving Innovation) Amendment Act, 2020 (Toews) First Reading — 2616 (Oct. 20, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 2666-81 (Oct. 21, 2020 aft.), 2741-55 (Oct. 26, 2020 eve.), 2803-15 (Oct. 27, 2020 eve), 2841-47 (Oct. 28, 2020 aft.), 2860-69 (Oct. 28, 2020 eve.), 2940-43 (Nov. 2, 2020 eve.), 2986-94 (Nov. 3, 2020 eve.), 3072-83 (Nov. 5, 2020 aft), 3126-36 (Nov. 16, 2020 eve.), 3208-12 (Nov. 17, 2020 eve.), 3265-72 (Nov. 18, 2020 eve.), 3361-65 (Nov. 23, 2020 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 3834 (Dec. 7, 2020 eve.), 3886-92 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve., passed on division) Third Reading — 3900 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve.), 3903-09 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020, with certain sections having effect on various dates; SA 2020 c40 ]

Bill 36 — Geothermal Resource Development Act (Savage) First Reading — 2616 (Oct. 20, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 2696-2706 (Oct. 22, 2020 aft.), 2755-60 (Oct. 26, 2020 eve.), 2925-29 (Nov. 2, 2020 eve.), 2974-78 (Nov. 3, 2020 aft.), 3121-24 (Nov. 16, 2020 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 3224-32 (Nov. 18, 2020 aft.), 3292-94 (Nov. 19, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 3336-42 (Nov. 23, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 cG-5.5 ]

Bill 37* — Builders’ Lien (Prompt Payment) Amendment Act, 2020 (Glubish) First Reading — 2665 (Oct. 21, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 2774-84 (Oct. 27, 2020 aft.), 2828-38 (Oct. 28, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3024-29 (Nov. 4, 2020 aft.), 3031-48 (Nov. 4, 2020 eve.), (Nov. 24, 2020 ), 3398-3401 (Nov. 24, 2020 aft., passed with amendments)

Third Reading — 3529-30 (Nov. 25, 2020 eve.), 3544-45 (Nov. 26, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2020 c30 ]

Bill 38 — Justice Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Madu) First Reading — 2665-66 (Oct. 21, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 2795-2800 (Oct. 27, 2020 eve.), 2838-41 (Oct. 28, 2020 aft.), 2884-93 (Oct. 29, 2020 aft.), 2960-65 (Nov. 3, 2020 aft.), 3124-26 (Nov. 16, 2020 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 3232-36 (Nov. 18, 2020 aft.), 3419-24 (Nov. 24, 2020 eve.), 3503-13 (Nov. 25, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 3611-14 (Nov. 30, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020, with exceptions, and with section 6 taking effect January 1, 2021; SA 2020 c37 ]

Bill 39* — Child Care Licensing (Early Learning and Child Care) Amendment Act, 2020 (Schulz) First Reading — 2827 (Oct. 28, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 2883-84 (Oct. 29, 2020 aft.), 2929-40 (Nov. 2, 2020 eve.), 2979-86 (Nov. 3, 2020 eve.), 3206-08 (Nov. 17, 2020 eve.), 3272-76 (Nov. 18, 2020 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 3357-61 (Nov. 23, 2020 eve.), 3401-09 (Nov. 24, 2020 aft.), 3411-19 (Nov. 24, 2020 eve.), 3513-25 (Nov. 25, 2020 eve., passed with amendments)

Third Reading — 3685 (Dec. 1, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force February 1, 2021; SA 2020 c31 ]

Bill 40 — Forests (Growing Alberta’s Forest Sector) Amendment Act, 2020 (Dreeshen) First Reading — 2696 (Oct. 22, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 2784-93 (Oct. 27, 2020 aft.), 2800-03 (Oct. 27, 2020 eve.), 2849-59 (Oct. 28, 2020 eve.), 2965-74 (Nov. 3, 2020 aft.), 3136-38 (Nov. 16, 2020 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 3424-27 (Nov. 24, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 3606-11 (Nov. 30, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force May 1, 2021, with exceptions; SA 2020 c34 ]

Bill 41 — Insurance (Enhancing Driver Affordability and Care) Amendment Act, 2020 (Toews) First Reading — 2882 (Oct. 29, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 2915-24 (Nov. 2, 2020 eve.), 3011-23 (Nov. 4, 2020 aft.), 3051-58 (Nov. 4, 2020 eve.), 3164-73 (Nov. 17, 2020 aft.), 3255-65 (Nov. 18, 2020 eve.), 3276 (Nov. 18, 2020 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 3679-85 (Dec. 1, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 3700-07 (Dec. 2, 2020 morn.), 3753-58 (Dec. 2, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020, except part of section 3, which has effect January 1, 2022; SA 2020 c36 ]

Bill 42 — North Saskatchewan River Basin Water Authorization Act (Nixon, JJ) First Reading — 2907 (Nov. 2, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 3009-11 (Nov. 4, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3048-51 (Nov. 4, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 3072 (Nov. 5, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020; SA 2020 cN-3.6 ]

Bill 43 — Financing Alberta’s Strategic Transportation Act (McIver) First Reading — 2956 (Nov. 3, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 3150-64 (Nov. 17, 2020 aft.), 3276-80 (Nov. 18, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3594-3605 (Nov. 30, 2020 eve.), 3687-3700 (Dec. 2, 2020 morn.), 3721-33 (Dec. 2, 2020 aft.), 3751-53 (Dec. 2, 2020 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 3784-88 (Dec. 3, 2020 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020; SA 2020 cF-13.5 ]

Bill 44 — Financial Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Toews) First Reading — 2956 (Nov. 3, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 3115-21 (Nov. 16, 2020 eve.), 3354-57 (Nov. 23, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3591-93 (Nov. 30, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 3685 (Dec. 1, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020; SA 2020 c33 ]

Bill 45 — Local Authorities Election Amendment Act, 2020 (No. 2) (Allard) First Reading — 3006 (Nov. 4, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 3175-79 (Nov. 17, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3525-29 (Nov. 25, 2020 eve.), 3654-65 (Dec. 1, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 3685 (Dec. 1, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force January 1, 2021; SA 2020 c38 ]

Bill 46 — Health Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (No. 2) (Shandro) First Reading — 3071 (Nov. 5, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 3176-92 (Nov. 17, 2020 eve.), 3342-54 (Nov. 23, 2020 eve.), 3459-65 (Nov. 25, 2020 morn.), 3614-22 (Nov. 30, 2020 eve.), 3675-76 (Dec. 1, 2020 aft.), 3788-93 (Dec. 3, 2020 aft., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 3823-34 (Dec. 7, 2020 eve.), 3853-60 (Dec. 8, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 3869 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve.), 3872-79 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020, with exceptions; SA 2020 c35 ]

Bill 47 — Ensuring Safety and Cutting Red Tape Act, 2020 ($) (Copping) First Reading — 3070-71 (Nov. 5, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 3192-206 (Nov. 17, 2020 eve.), 3236-45 (Nov. 18, 2020 aft.), 3367-73 (Nov. 24, 2020 morn.), 3427-41 (Nov. 24, 2020 eve.), 3445-59 (Nov. 25, 2020 morn.), 3622-28 (Nov. 30, 2020 eve.), 3630-42 (Dec. 1, 2020 morn.), 3743-51 (Dec. 2, 2020 eve., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 3763-70 (Dec. 3, 2020 morn.), 3893-3900 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve., passed on division) Third Reading — 3901-02 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve.), 3910-16 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation, with exceptions; SA 2020 c32 ]

Bill 48* — Red Tape Reduction Implementation Act, 2020 (No. 2) (Hunter) First Reading — 3096 (Nov. 16, 2020 aft, passed) Second Reading — 3247-55 (Nov. 18, 2020 eve.), 3387-98 (Nov. 24, 2020 aft.), 3441-43 (Nov. 24, 2020 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3665-75 (Dec. 1, 2020 aft.), 3733-40 (Dec. 2, 2020 aft.), 3759-62 (Dec. 2, 2020 eve.), 3834-36 (Dec. 7, 2020 eve.), 3861-68 (Dec. 8, 2020 aft., passed on division)

Third Reading — 3869-70 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve.), 3879-86 (Dec. 8, 2020 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on December 9, 2020, with exceptions; SA 2020 c39 ]

Bill 49* — Labour Mobility Act (Kenney) First Reading — 5647 (Oct. 25, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5680-95 (Oct. 26, 2021 aft.), 5709-17 (Oct. 26, 2021 eve.), 5728-37 (Oct. 27, 2021 morn.), 5802-07 (Oct. 28, 2021 morn.), 5951-61 (Nov. 2, 2021 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 6175-85 (Nov. 16, 2021 eve., passed; amendments agreed to) Third Reading — 6293-95 (Nov. 18, 2021 aft., adjourned)

Bill 50 — Appropriation (Supplementary Supply) Act, 2020 ($) (Toews) First Reading — 3502 (Nov. 25, 2020 aft., passed) Second Reading — 3545-52 (Nov. 26, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3587-91 (Nov. 30, 2020 eve., passed) Third Reading — 3677-79 (Dec. 1, 2020 eve.), 3685 (Dec. 1, 2020 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020; SA 2020 c29 ]

Bill 51* — Citizen Initiative Act (Madu) First Reading — 4058 (Mar. 16, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4340-41 (Apr. 7, 2021 aft.), 4567-73 (Apr. 14, 2021 eve.), 4690-97 (Apr. 20, 2021 aft., passed on division) Committee of the Whole — 5159-86 (Jun. 2, 2021 eve., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 5398-5401 (Jun. 9, 2021 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2021 cC-13.2 ]

Bill 52 — Recall Act (Madu) First Reading — 4028-29 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4633-42 (Apr. 19, 2021 eve.), 4846-58 (May 25, 2021 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 5403-24 (Jun. 9, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 5542-48 (Jun. 15, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2021 cR-5.7 ]

Bill 53 — Service Alberta Statutes (Virtual Meetings) Amendment Act, 2021 (Glubish) First Reading — 3971 (Mar. 9, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4043-44 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft.), 4129-30 (Mar. 18, 2021 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 4245-49 (Mar. 24, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 4252-53 (Mar. 24, 2021 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Mar. 26, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force August 15, 2020, except for section 5, which comes into force March 26, 2021; SA 2021 c3 ]

Bill 54 — Irrigation Districts Amendment Act, 2021 (Dreeshen) First Reading — 3992 (Mar. 10, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4212-14 (Mar. 24, 2021 aft.), 4291-4302 (Apr. 6, 2021 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 4361-66 (Apr. 7, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 4396-99 (Apr. 8, 2021 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Apr. 22, 2021 aft.) [Comes into force April 22, 2021; SA 2021 c5 ]

Bill 55 — College of Alberta School Superintendents Act (LaGrange) First Reading — 3979 (Mar. 9, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4044-45 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft.), 4107-10 (Mar. 17, 2021 aft.), 4302-08 (Apr. 6, 2021 aft.), 4453-56 (Apr. 12, 2021 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 4594-601 (Apr. 15, 2021 aft., passed) Third Reading — 4788-93 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Apr. 22, 2021 aft.) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2021 cC-18.8 ]

Bill 56 — Local Measures Statutes Amendment Act, 2021 (McIver) First Reading — 4005 (Mar. 11, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4045 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft.), 4309-17 (Apr. 6, 2021 eve.), 4342-60 (Apr. 7, 2021 aft.), 4367-82 (Apr. 7, 2021 eve.), 4400-04 (Apr. 8, 2021 aft.), 4435-53 (Apr. 12, 2021 eve.), 4657-63 (Apr. 19, 2021 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 4877-83 (May 25, 2021 eve.), 4953-58 (May 26, 2021 eve.), 4970 (May 27, 2021 aft., passed) Third Reading — 5186-87 (Jun. 2, 2021 eve.), 5297-5302 (Jun. 8, 2021 morn.), 5439-41 (Jun. 10, 2021 morn.), 5579-85 (Jun. 16, 2021 morn., passed on division)

Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2021 c11 ]

Bill 57* — Metis Settlements Amendment Act, 2021 (Wilson) First Reading — 4005 (Mar. 11, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4045-46 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft.), 4501-12 (Apr. 13, 2021 eve.), 4573-80 (Apr. 14, 2021 eve., passed on division) Committee of the Whole — 4743-52 (Apr. 21, 2021 aft.), 4883-88 (May 25, 2021 eve.), 4971-77 (May 27, 2021 aft., passed; amendments agreed to)

Third Reading — 5189-95 (Jun. 3, 2021 morn.), 5222 (Jun. 3, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2021 c12 ]

Bill 58 — Freedom to Care Act (Aheer) First Reading — 4180 (Mar. 23, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4214-15 (Mar. 24, 2021 aft.), 4456 (Apr. 12, 2021 eve.), 4560-67 (Apr. 14, 2021 eve.), 4682-90 (Apr. 20, 2021 aft.), 4726-27 (Apr. 20, 2021 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 5343-52 (Jun. 8, 2021 eve.), 5496-5507 (Jun. 14, 2021 eve.), 5549-60 (Jun. 15, 2021 eve.), 5585 (Jun. 16, 2021 morn.), 5599-5603 (Jun. 16, 2021 aft., passed)

Third Reading — 5603-08 (Jun. 16, 2021 aft.), 5609-13 (Jun. 16, 2021 aft.), 5622-25 (Jun. 16, 2021 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force September 1, 2021; SA 2021 cF-25.4 ]

Bill 59 — Appropriation (Supplementary Supply) Act, 2021 ($) (Toews) First Reading — 4083 (Mar. 16, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4099-4102 (Mar. 17, 2021 aft.), 4110-15 (Mar. 17, 2021 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 4130-38 (Mar. 18, 2021 aft., passed) Third Reading — 4215-20 (Mar. 24, 2021 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Mar. 26, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force March 26, 2021; SA 2021 c2 ]

Bill 60 — Appropriation Act, 2021 ($) (Toews) First Reading — 4099 (Mar. 17, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4180-99 (Mar. 23, 2021 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 4220-33 (Mar. 24, 2021 aft.), 4249-52 (Mar. 24, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 4268-76 (Mar. 25, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Mar. 26, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force March 26, 2021; SA 2021 c1 ]

Bill 61 — Vital Statistics Amendment Act, 2021 (Glubish) First Reading — 4150 (Mar. 22, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4341-42 (Apr. 7, 2021 aft.), 4512-13 (Apr. 13, 2021 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 4752-59 (Apr. 21, 2021 aft., passed) Third Reading — 4793-94 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Apr. 22, 2021 aft.) [Comes into force April 22, 2021, with sections 2(a), 5, 9 and 10 coming into force on proclamation; SA 2021 c7 ]

Bill 62 — Red Tape Reduction Implementation Act, 2021 (Hunter) First Reading — 4393-94 (Apr. 8, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4675-82 (Apr. 20, 2021 aft.), 4760-61 (Apr. 21, 2021 aft.), 4759 (Apr. 21, 2021 aft.), 5011-19 (May 31, 2021 eve.), 5106-11 (Jun. 1, 2021 eve., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 5124-31 (Jun. 2, 2021 morn), 5199-207 (Jun. 3, 2021 morn., passed) Third Reading — 5222-23 (Jun. 3, 2021 aft.), 5291-97 (Jun. 8, 2021 morn.), 5367-74 (Jun. 9, 2021 morn.), 5430-33 (Jun. 10, 2021 morn., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2021 c16 ]

Bill 63 — Police (Street Checks and Carding) Amendment Act, 2021 (Madu) First Reading — 4340 (Apr. 7, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4699-704 (Apr. 20, 2021 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 5074-81 (Jun. 1, 2021 aft.), 5083 (Jun. 1, 2021 eve.), 5144-54 (Jun. 2, 2021 aft., passed) Third Reading — 5456-59 (Jun. 10, 2021 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2021 c14 ]

Bill 64 — Public Lands Amendment Act, 2021 (Nixon, JJ) First Reading — 4416 (Apr. 12, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4475-87 (Apr. 13, 2021 aft.), 4547-60 (Apr. 14, 2021 eve.), 4642-57 (Apr. 19, 2021 eve.), 4821-32 (May 25, 2021 morn.), 4858-62 (May 25, 2021 aft.), 4864-71 (May 25, 2021 eve., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 4871-77 (May 25, 2021 eve.), 4890-4900 (May 26, 2021 morn.), 4931-34 (May 26, 2021 aft.), 4935-37 (May 26, 2021 eve., passed)

Third Reading — 4938-44 (May 26, 2021 eve.), 4946-53 (May 26, 2021 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (May 27, 2021 aft.) [Comes into force May 27, 2021; SA 2021 c8 ]

Bill 65 — Health Statutes Amendment Act, 2021 (Shandro) First Reading — 4394 (Apr. 8, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4526-35 (Apr. 14, 2021 aft.), 4759-60 (Apr. 21, 2021 aft.), 4766-79 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve.), 4809-17 (Apr. 22, 2021 aft., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 5064-74 (Jun. 1, 2021 aft.., passed) Third Reading — 5283-88 (Jun. 7, 2021 eve.), 5257 (Jun. 7, 2021 eve.), 5363-67 (Jun. 9, 2021 morn., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 17, 2021, except sections 1, 3 and 7, which come into force on proclamation; SA 2021 c10 ]

Bill 66 — Public Health Amendment Act, 2021 (Shandro) First Reading — 4416 (Apr. 12, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4487-88 (Apr. 13, 2021 aft.), 4489-501 (Apr. 13, 2021 eve.), 4535-46 (Apr. 14, 2021 aft.), 4704-19 (Apr. 20, 2021 eve.), 4779-88 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve.), 4900-4904 (May 26, 2021 morn., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 5083-97 (Jun. 1, 2021 eve.), 5338-43 (Jun. 8, 2021 eve.), 5507 (Jun. 14, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 5570-75 (Jun. 15, 2021 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation, with exceptions; SA 2021 c15 ]

Bill 67 — Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Education Act (Nicolaides) First Reading — 4468 (Apr. 13, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4593-94 (Apr. 15, 2021 aft.), 4719-26 (Apr. 20, 2021 eve.), 5097-5106 (Jun. 1, 2021 eve.), 5113-24 (Jun. 2, 2021 morn., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 5272-83 (Jun. 7, 2021 eve.), 5386-98 (Jun. 9, 2021 aft., passed) Third Reading — 5433-39 (Jun. 10, 2021 morn.), 5459 (Jun. 10, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2021 cS-7.88 ]

Bill 68 — Election Statutes Amendment Act, 2021 (Madu) First Reading — 4614 (Apr. 19, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4808 (Apr. 22, 2021 aft.), 5019-32 (May 31, 2021 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 5154-57 (Jun. 2, 2021 aft), 5159 (Jun. 2, 2021 eve, passed) Third Reading — 5195-99 (Jun. 3, 2021 morn.), 5222 (Jun. 3, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on proclamation, except section 1, which has effect January 1, 2021; SA 2021 c9 ]

Bill 69 — Miscellaneous Statutes Amendment Act, 2021 (Nixon, JJ) First Reading — 4592 (Apr. 15, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5288-89 (Jun. 7, 2021 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 5424 (Jun. 9, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 5424 (Jun. 9, 2021 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force on various dates; SA 2021 c13 ]

Bill 70 — COVID-19 Related Measures Act (Gotfried) First Reading — 4806 (Apr. 22, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5331-38 (Jun. 8, 2021 eve.), 5357-63 (Jun. 9, 2021 morn.), 5425-30 (Jun. 10, 2021 morn.), 5485-96 (Jun. 14, 2021 eve.), 5516-22 (Jun. 15, 2021 morn.), 5536-42 (Jun. 15, 2021 aft., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 5560-64 (Jun. 15, 2021 eve.), 5568-70 (Jun. 15, 2021 eve.), 5615-20 (Jun. 16, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 5620-21 (Jun. 16, 2021 eve.), 5625-31 (Jun. 16, 2021 eve., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force March 1, 2020; SA 2021 cC-31.3 ]

Bill 71 — Employment Standards (COVID-19 Vaccination Leave) Amendment Act, 2021 (Copping) First Reading — 4763 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve., passed) Second Reading — 4763-64 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 4764-65 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 4766 (Apr. 21, 2021 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Apr. 22, 2021 aft.) [Comes into force April 21, 2021; SA 2021 c4 ]

Bill 72 — Preserving Canada's Economic Prosperity Act (Savage) First Reading — 4844 (May 25, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 4916-29 (May 26, 2021 aft.), 5032-37 (May 31, 2021 eve.), 5046-51 (Jun. 1, 2021 morn.), 5039-45 (Jun. 1, 2021 morn.), 5189 (Jun. 3, 2021 morn.), 5221-22 (Jun. 3, 2021 aft., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 5352-56 (Jun. 8, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 5455-56 (Jun. 10, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force May 1, 2021; SA 2021 cP-21.51 ]

Bill 73 — Infrastructure Accountability Act (Panda) First Reading — 5647 (Oct. 25, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5675-79 (Oct. 26, 2021 aft.), 5697-5709 (Oct. 26, 2021 eve.), 5719-28 (Oct. 27, 2021 morn.), 6011-23 (Nov. 3, 2021 eve.), 6099-6104 (Nov. 15, 2021 eve.), 6185-86 (Nov. 16, 2021 eve.), 6202-05 (Nov. 17, 2021 morn.), 6274-80 (Nov. 18, 2021 morn., passed)

Bill 74 — Advanced Education Statutes Amendment Act, 2021 (Nicolaides) First Reading — 5673 (Oct. 26, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5773-93 (Oct. 27, 2021 eve.), 5807-12 (Oct. 28, 2021 morn.), 5826-34 (Oct. 28, 2021 aft.), 5895-5908 (Nov. 2, 2021 morn.), 6027 (Nov. 3, 2021 eve., passed on division)

Committee of the Whole — 6230-40 (Nov. 17, 2021 aft.), 6241-44 (Nov. 17, 2021 eve., passed)

Bill 75 — Arts Professions Recognition Act (Orr) First Reading — 5673-74 (Oct. 26, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5752-71 (Oct. 27, 2021 aft.), 5936-39 (Nov. 2, 2021 aft.), 5963-70 (Nov. 3, 2021 morn.), 6023-27 (Nov. 3, 2021 eve.), 6061-70 (Nov. 4, 2021 aft., passed)

Committee of the Whole — 6226-30 (Nov. 17, 2021 aft., adjourned)

Bill 76 — Captive Insurance Companies Act (Toews) First Reading — 5750 (Oct. 27, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5825-26 (Oct. 28, 2021 aft.), 5944-51 (Nov. 2, 2021 eve.), 5986-6003 (Nov. 3, 2021 aft.), 6145-52 (Nov. 16, 2021 aft., passed)

Bill 77 — Municipal Government (Restoring Tax Accountability) Amendment Act, 2021 (McIver) First Reading — 5823-24 (Oct. 28, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 5928-36 (Nov. 2, 2021 aft.), 6039-48 (Nov. 4, 2021 morn.), 6112-17 (Nov. 15, 2021 eve.), 6244-50 (Nov. 17, 2021 eve., passed)

Bill 78 — Alberta Housing Amendment Act, 2021 (Pon) First Reading — 5845-46 (Nov. 1, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 6029-39 (Nov. 4, 2021 morn.), 6126-32 (Nov. 16, 2021 morn.), 6187-97 (Nov. 17, 2021 morn., adjourned)

Bill 79 — Trails Act (Nixon, JJ) First Reading — 5919 (Nov. 2, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 6104-12 (Nov. 15, 2021 eve., adjourned)

Bill 80 — Red Tape Reduction Implementation Act, 2021 (No. 2) (Fir) First Reading — 6060 (Nov. 4, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 6119-26 (Nov. 16, 2021 morn., adjourned)

Bill 81 — Election Statutes Amendment Act, 2021 (No. 2) (Madu) First Reading — 6060 (Nov. 4, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 6144-45 (Nov. 16, 2021 aft.), 6167-75 (Nov. 16, 2021 eve., adjourned on amendment)

Bill 82 — Mineral Resource Development Act (Savage) First Reading — 6060 (Nov. 4, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 6152-65 (Nov. 16, 2021 aft.), 6261-68 (Nov. 18, 2021 morn., passed)

Bill 83 — Environmental Protection and Enhancement Amendment Act, 2021 (Nixon, JJ) First Reading — 6084 (Nov. 15, 2021 aft., passed) Second Reading — 6250-58 (Nov. 17, 2021 eve.), 6268-74 (Nov. 18, 2021 morn.., passed)

Bill 84 — Business Corporations Amendment Act, 2021 (Glubish) First Reading — 6084 (Nov. 15, 2021 aft., passed)

Bill 85 — Education Statutes (Students First) Amendment Act, 2021 (LaGrange) First Reading — 6143 (Nov. 16, 2021 aft., passed)

Bill 86 — Electricity Statutes Amendment Act, 2021 (Nally) First Reading — 6218 (Nov. 17, 2021 aft., passed)

Bill 201 — Strategic Aviation Advisory Council Act (Gotfried) First Reading — 62 (Feb. 27, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 136 (Mar. 5, 2020 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 914-26 (Jun. 1, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 1156-61 (Jun. 8, 2020 aft.), 1337-47 (Jun. 15, 2020 aft, passed) Third Reading — 1514-22 (Jun. 22, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 26, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 31, 2020; SA 2020 cS-19.8 ]

Bill 202 — Conflicts of Interest (Protecting the Rule of Law) Amendment Act, 2020 (Ganley) First Reading — 136 (Mar. 5, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 1149-56 (Jun. 2, 2020 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill not proceed repoted to Assembly), 1156 (Jun. 8, 2020 aft., debate on concurrence motion; not proceeded with on division)

Bill 203 — Pension Protection Act (Gray) First Reading — 1148 (Jun. 8, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 1839 (Jul. 8, 2020 aft., reported to Assembly; not proceeded with)

Bill 204 — Voluntary Blood Donations Repeal Act (Yao) First Reading — 1839 (Jul. 8, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 2288 (Jul. 22, 2020 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 2379-93 (Jul. 27, 2020 aft., passed on division) Committee of the Whole — 2720-33 (Oct. 26, 2020 aft.), 2908-09 (Nov. 2, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 3096-3103 (Nov. 16, 2020 aft., passed on divison) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020; SA 2020 c41 ]

Bill 205* — Genocide Remembrance, Condemnation and Prevention Month Act (Singh) First Reading — 2718 (Oct. 26, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 3070 (Nov. 5, 2020 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 3103-08 (Nov. 16, 2020 aft.), 3307-14 (Nov. 23, 2020 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3813-14 (Dec. 7, 2020 aft.), 3948-59 (Mar. 8, 2021 aft.), 4036-37 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 4158-64 (Mar. 22, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Mar. 26, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force January 1, 2021; SA 2021 cG-5.4 ]

Bill 206 — Property Rights Statutes Amendment Act, 2020 (Glasgo) First Reading — 2827 (Oct. 28, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 3223-24 (Nov. 18, 2020 aft, reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 3314-21 (Nov. 23, 2020 aft.), 4037-42 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft.), 4417-19 (Apr. 12, 2021 aft., passed on division), 4419 (Apr. 12, 2021 aft., referred to Select Special Committee on Real Property Rights)

Bill 207* — Reservists' Recognition Day Act (Rutherford) First Reading — 3224 (Nov. 18, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 3719 (Dec. 2, 2020 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 4419-29 (Apr. 12, 2021 aft.), 4616-20 (Apr. 19, 2021 aft., passed on division) Committee of the Whole — 5476-79 (Jun. 14, 2021 aft.), 5653-56 (Oct. 25, 2021 aft.), 5850-59 (Nov. 1, 2021 aft., passed; amendments agreed to)

Third Reading — 6088-96 (Nov. 15, 2021 aft., passed on division)

Bill 208 — Alberta Investment Management Corporation Amendment Act, 2020 (Phillips) First Reading — 3782 (Dec. 3, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 4005 (Mar. 11, 2021 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill proceed reported to Assembly), 4029-36 (Mar. 15, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion; not proceeded with on division)

Bill 209 — Cost of Public Services Transparency Act (Stephan) First Reading — 3806-07 (Dec. 7, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 4005 (Mar. 11, 2021 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 4620 (Apr. 19, 2021 aft., adjourned)

Bill 211* — Municipal Government (Firearms) Amendment Act, 2020 (Glasgo) First Reading — 3849 (Dec. 8, 2020 aft., passed), 3930 (Feb. 25, 2021 aft., moved to Government Bills and Orders) Second Reading — 4006-15 (Mar. 11, 2021 aft.), 4102-07 (Mar. 17, 2021 aft., passed) Committee of the Whole — 4326-28 (Apr. 6, 2021 eve., passed with amendments) Third Reading — 4399-4400 (Apr. 8, 2021 aft., passed on division) Royal Assent — (Apr. 22, 2021 aft.) [Comes into force on proclamation; SA 2021 c6 ]

Bill 212 — Official Sport of Alberta Act (Yaseen) First Reading — 3849 (Dec. 8, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 4088 (Mar. 17, 2021 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill proceed reported to Assembly), 4151-58 (Mar. 22, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion; proceeded with on division)

Bill 213 — Traffic Safety (Maximum Speed Limit for Provincial Freeways) Amendment Act, 2021 (Turton) First Reading — 3992 (Mar. 10, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 4179 (Mar. 23, 2021 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Bill 214 — Eastern Slopes Protection Act (Notley) First Reading — 4340 (Apr. 7, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Public Members' Private Bills), 4667 (Apr. 20, 2021 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill proceed reported to Assembly), 5242-49 (Jun. 7, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion; proceeded with)

Bill 215 — Seniors Advocate Act (Sigurdson, L) First Reading — 4592 (Apr. 15, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Public Members' Private Bills), 4806 (Apr. 22, 2021 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill proceed reported to Assembly), 5249-51 (Jun. 7, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion), 5471-73 (Jun. 14, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion), 5652-53 (Oct. 25, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion), 5846-49 (Nov. 1, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion; proceeded with)

Bill 216 — Fire Prevention and Fire Services Recognition Act (Lovely) First Reading — 4592 (Apr. 15, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Public Members' Private Bills), 4843 (May 25, 2021 aft.., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Bill 217 — Polish-Canadian Heritage Day Act (Williams) First Reading — 4969-70 (May 27, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 5220 (Jun. 3, 2021 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 5631-32 (Jun. 16, 2021 eve., passed) Committee of the Whole — 5633 (Jun. 16, 2021 eve., passed) Third Reading — 5633-34 (Jun. 16, 2021 eve., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 17, 2021; SA 2021 cP-18.3 ]

Bill 218 — Provincial Parks (Protecting Park Boundaries) Amendment Act, 2021 (Schmidt) First Reading — 4970 (May 27, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 5237 (Jun. 7, 2021 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill proceed reported to Assembly), 5473-74 (Jun. 14, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion), 5653 (Oct. 25, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion), 5849-50 (Nov. 1, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion), 6084-88 (Nov. 15, 2021 aft., debate on concurrence motion; proceeded with on division)

Bill 219 — Workers’ Compensation (Expanding Presumptive Coverage) Amendment Act, 2021 (Sweet) First Reading — 5220 (Jun. 3, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Public Members' Public Bills), 5454 (Jun. 10, 2021 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill proceed reported to Assembly), 5474-76 (Jun. 14, 2021 aft.), 5653 (Oct. 25, 2021 aft., adjourned debate on concurrence motion)

Bill 220 — Employment Standards (Expanding Bereavement Leave) Amendment Act, 2021 (Walker) First Reading — 5534 (Jun. 15, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), (Nov. 3, 2021 aft., Committee recommendation that Bill proceed reported to Assembly; debate on concurrence motion to take place Monday, November 15, 2021)

Bill Pr1 — The Sisters of the Precious Blood of Edmonton Repeal Act (Williams) First Reading — 1125 (Jun. 4, 2020 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 3292 (Nov. 19, 2020 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 3629-30 (Dec. 1, 2020 morn., passed) Committee of the Whole — 3740 (Dec. 2, 2020 aft., passed) Third Reading — 3740-41 (Dec. 2, 2020 aft., passed) Royal Assent — (Dec. 9, 2020 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force December 9, 2020; SA 2020 c42 ]

Bill Pr2 — The United Church of Canada Amendment Act, 2021 (Phillips) First Reading — 4416-17 (Apr. 12, 2021 aft., passed; referred to the Standing Committee on Private Bills and Private Members' Public Bills), 4843-44 (May 25, 2021 aft., reported to Assembly; proceeded with)

Second Reading — 5045 (Jun. 1, 2021 morn., passed) Committee of the Whole — 5045 (Jun. 1, 2021 morn., passed) Third Reading — 5045-46 (Jun. 1, 2021 morn., passed) Royal Assent — (Jun. 17, 2021 outside of House sitting) [Comes into force June 17, 2021; SA 2021 ]

Table of Contents

Members’ Statements United Conservative Party ................................................................................................................................................................... 6281 Film and Television Industry ............................................................................................................................................................... 6281 Women’s Entrepreneurship Week ....................................................................................................................................................... 6281 Homeless Supports and Affordable Housing ....................................................................................................................................... 6282 Economic Recovery and Growth ......................................................................................................................................................... 6282 Support for Agriculture ....................................................................................................................................................................... 6282 COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout and Economic Recovery ........................................................................................................................ 6283 Federal-provincial Child Care Agreement ........................................................................................................................................... 6283 Premier’s Leadership ........................................................................................................................................................................... 6283

Oral Question Period COVID-19 Contact Tracing ................................................................................................................................................................ 6283 Municipal Funding .............................................................................................................................................................................. 6284 Rural Health Care and Emergency Medical Services .......................................................................................................................... 6285 Severe Weather Impact Mitigation and Response ............................................................................................................................... 6285 Petrochemicals and Hydrogen Industries............................................................................................................................................. 6286 Provincial Police Force Proposal ......................................................................................................................................................... 6286 Electric Power Prices ........................................................................................................................................................................... 6287 Economic Development and Investment Attraction ............................................................................................................................ 6287 United Conservative Party ................................................................................................................................................................... 6288 Restrictions Exemption Program Implementation ............................................................................................................................... 6288 Federal-provincial Child Care Agreement ........................................................................................................................................... 6289 School Bus Insurance Costs ................................................................................................................................................................ 6290 Mental Health Services ........................................................................................................................................................................ 6290 Alberta Health Services ....................................................................................................................................................................... 6291

Tabling Returns and Reports .................................................................................................................................................................... 6291

Tablings to the Clerk ................................................................................................................................................................................ 6292

Orders of the Day ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 6293

Government Bills and Orders Third Reading

Bill 49 Labour Mobility Act ....................................................................................................................................................... 6293

Government Motions Equalization Payments ........................................................................................................................................................................ 6295

Alberta Hansard is available online at www.assembly.ab.ca For inquiries contact: Editor Alberta Hansard 3rd Floor, 9820 – 107 St EDMONTON, AB T5K 1E7 Telephone: 780.427.1875 E-mail: AlbertaHansard@assembly.ab.ca Published under the Authority of the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta ISSN 0383-3623