Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 156, Number 4: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

January 22, 2022

DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES AND OCEANS

SPECIES AT RISK ACT

Description of the critical habitat of the Striped Bass, St. Lawrence River population, in the Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area, Saint-Vallier Bird Sanctuary, Montmagny Bird Sanctuary, Cap-Saint-Ignace Bird Sanctuary, L’Islet Bird Sanctuary and Trois-Saumons Bird Sanctuary

The Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis), St. Lawrence River population, is an anadromous fish species listed as endangered on Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act. The Recovery Strategy and Action Plan for the Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis), St. Lawrence River population, in Canada identifies critical habitat for the species in a number of areas located in the fluvial or upper estuary of the St. Lawrence River, including areas protected under federal legislation.

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 58(2) of the Species at Risk Act, that 90 days after the date of publication of this notice, subsection 58(1) of the Act will apply to the critical habitat of the Striped Bass, as identified in the recovery strategy and action plan included on the Species at Risk Public Registry, within the following federally protected areas: Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area, as described in Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Area Regulations made pursuant to the Canada Wildlife Act, and Saint-Vallier Bird Sanctuary, Montmagny Bird Sanctuary, Cap-Saint-Ignace Bird Sanctuary, L’Islet Bird Sanctuary and Trois-Saumons Bird Sanctuary, as described in the schedule of the Migratory Bird Sanctuary Regulations made pursuant to the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994.

Kate Ladell
Director General
Biodiversity Management

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Final guidelines for Canadian drinking water quality for diquat

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of the final guidelines for Canadian drinking water quality for diquat. The technical document for these guidelines is available on the Water Quality website. This document underwent a public consultation period of 90 days in 2020 and was updated to take into consideration the comments received.

January 21, 2022

Greg Carreau
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Guideline value

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for diquat in drinking water is 0.05 mg/L (50 µg/L) [measured as the cation].

Executive summary

This guideline technical document was prepared in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water and is based on assessments of diquat completed by Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency and supporting documents.

Exposure

In Canada, diquat is an herbicide that is deliberately applied to food crops and to water sources for weed control. The general Canadian population is therefore potentially exposed to diquat through food, and to a lesser extent, drinking water. In 2018, the most recent year for which data are available, more than 500 000 kg of diquat (as active ingredient) was sold in Canada. Very low levels of diquat have been detected in foods. Data provided by provinces and territories that monitor for diquat in source and drinking water indicate that levels of diquat are below the detection limit.

Health effects

In repeat-dose animal studies, diquat primarily targeted the eyes, causing cataracts. It also affected the kidneys and liver. The MAC of 0.05 mg/L (50 µg/L) is based on cataract formation.

Analytical and treatment considerations

Currently, there is one method available for the analysis of diquat in drinking water. The method detection limit is more than an order of magnitude below the MAC.

Granular activated carbon is considered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency to be the best available technology for removing diquat from water. Membrane filtration techniques (nanofiltration and reverse osmosis or RO) and oxidation may also be effective. It is recommended that pilot- and/or bench-scale testing be conducted prior to full-scale implementation of treatment.

In cases where diquat removal is desired at a small system or household level — for example when the drinking water supply is from a private well — a residential drinking water treatment unit may be an option. Adsorption (activated carbon) and RO represent the best potential technologies for diquat removal. When using a residential drinking water treatment unit, it is important to take samples of water entering and leaving the treatment unit and to send them to an accredited laboratory for analysis to ensure that adequate diquat removal is occurring.

Application of the guidelines

Note: Specific guidance related to the implementation of drinking water guidelines should be obtained from the appropriate drinking water authority.

The guidelines are protective against health effects from exposure to diquat in drinking water over a lifetime. Any exceedance of the MAC should be investigated and followed by the appropriate corrective actions if required. For exceedances in source water where there is no treatment in place, additional monitoring to confirm the exceedance should be conducted. If it is confirmed that source water diquat concentrations are above the MAC, then an investigation to determine the most appropriate way to reduce exposure to diquat should be conducted. This may include use of an alternate water supply or installation of treatment. Where treatment is already in place and an exceedance occurs, an investigation should be conducted to verify treatment and to determine whether adjustments are needed to lower the treated water concentration below the MAC.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Lethbridge Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

  • Steve Veale

Ottawa, January 5, 2022

Darryl Sitka
Acting Director General
Crime Prevention Branch

ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE CANADA

SPECIES AT RISK ACT

Description of Cerulean Warbler critical habitat in the Philipsburg Bird Sanctuary

The Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) is listed as endangered on Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act and is a migratory bird protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. This species occurs in mature deciduous forests of eastern North America and winters in montane forests in the northern Andes. In Canada, the Cerulean Warbler breeds in southwestern and eastern Ontario and southwestern Quebec.

The latest recovery strategy for the Cerulean Warbler, available on the Species at Risk Public Registry, identifies the critical habitat for the species in a number of areas, including within a federally protected area.

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to subsection 58(2) of the Species at Risk Act, subsection 58(1) of that Act applies, 90 days after this publication, to the critical habitat of the Cerulean Warbler — identified in the recovery strategy for that species that is included on the Species at Risk Public Registry — that is found within the Philipsburg Bird Sanctuary, as described in the schedule to the Migratory Bird Sanctuary Regulations made pursuant to the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994.

Interested parties are invited to contact Environment and Climate Change Canada by email at ec.protectionep-sarprotection.ec@canada.ca to request clarification regarding the location, biophysical attributes and protection of this species’ critical habitat. However, some details may be withheld to protect the species and its critical habitat.

January 22, 2022

Sarah Wren
Director
Species at Risk Act Implementation
Canadian Wildlife Service

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council appointments website.

Governor in Council appointment opportunities
Position Organization Closing date
Chief Executive Officer Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse  
Member Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board  
Chief Executive Officer Canadian Dairy Commission  
Deputy Chief Commissioner Canadian Human Rights Commission  
Member Canadian Human Rights Commission  
Member Canadian Museum of Nature  
Chairperson Invest in Canada Hub  
Chief Executive Officer Invest in Canada Hub  
Director Invest in Canada Hub  
Commissioner Law Commission of Canada  
President Law Commission of Canada  
Privacy Commissioner Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada  
Director (Federal) Québec Port Authority  
Director Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority