Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 154, Number 31: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

August 1, 2020

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of nine substances of the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas five of the nine substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on four substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on five substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the five substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining four substances at this time.

Jonathan Wilkinson
Minister of the Environment

Patty Hajdu
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 9 of 16 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group. The nine substances in this assessment were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health or ecological considerations. Fats and glyceridic oils, margosa (CAS RNfootnote 1 8002-65-1) were included in the draft screening assessment for the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group published on August 18, 2018; however, based on additional information received, this UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products or biological materials) substance requires further assessment. Further evaluation of this substance will be provided in a separate screening assessment. Of the 16 substances, 4 were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports.footnote 2,footnote 3 Additionally, two substances were placed into another substance group to which they are more appropriately suited on the basis of chemical structure and uses.footnote 4 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the nine substances listed in the table below. The nine substances addressed in this screening assessment report will hereinafter be referred to as the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names, and the common names and abbreviations are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group

CAS RN

DSL name

Common name (abbreviation)

112-38-9

10-Undecenoic acid

Undecylenic acid

463-40-1

9,12,15-Octadecatrienoic acid, (Z,Z,Z)

α-Linolenic acid (ALA)

8001-20-5 table a1 note a table a1 note b

Tung oil

Tung oil

61790-12-3 table a1 note a

Fatty acids, tall-oil

Tall oil fatty acid

61790-44-1 table a1 note a

Fatty acids, tall-oil, potassium salts

Tall oil fatty acids, potassium salts

90028-66-3 table a1 note a table a1 note c

Evening primrose, Oenothera biennis, ext.

Evening primrose oil

61788-89-4 table a1 note a

Fatty acids, C18-unsaturated, dimers

Dimer acid

68937-90-6 table a1 note a table a1 note b

Fatty acids, C18-unsaturated, trimers

Trimer acid

92044-87-6 table a1 note a table a1 note c

Fatty acids, coco, 2-ethylhexyl esters

Ethylhexyl cocoate

Table a1 note(s)

Table a1 note a

The substance bearing this CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Return to table a1 note a referrer

Table a1 note b

The substance bearing this CAS RN was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table a1 note b referrer

Table a1 note c

The substance bearing this CAS RN was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority on the basis of other ecological considerations.

Return to table a1 note c referrer

Four of the nine fatty acids and derivatives were reported, pursuant to a survey under section 71 of CEPA, to have been manufactured in Canada in 2011 at quantities of 1 430 kg for tall oil fatty acid, 10 000 to 100 000 kg for tall oil fatty acids, potassium salts, and 100 to 1 000 kg each for dimer and trimer acids. Seven of the nine substances were reported to have been imported into Canada the same year at quantities of 1 000 to 10 000 kg for ALA, 120 412 kg for tung oil, 6 317 473 kg for tall oil fatty acid, 47 992 kg for tall oil fatty acids, potassium salts, 293 472 kg for dimer acid, 1 088 638 kg for trimer acid and 6 470 kg for ethylhexyl cocoate. The remaining two substances, undecylenic acid and evening primrose oil, were not reported to be manufactured or imported into Canada in 2011 above the reporting threshold of 100 kg.

These substances occur naturally in the environment or are derived from natural sources, such as plants and animal fats and oils. The substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group have a number of reported uses, including in lubricants and greases, adhesives and sealants, paints and coatings, fuels and related products, and food packaging. Some of these products are available to consumers. Several of the substances included in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group are used in cosmetics, as well as in natural and non-prescription health products.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established principally on the basis of mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, the substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group are considered unlikely to be causing ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from the nine substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group. It is concluded that undecylenic acid; ALA; tung oil; tall oil fatty acid; tall oil fatty acids, potassium salts; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; trimer acid; and ethylhexyl cocoate do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

ALA was assessed together with a group of aliphatic acids by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 2014. ALA and the major components of tall oil fatty acid, evening primrose oil, dimer/trimer acid and the free fatty acids of ethylhexyl cocoate were not identified by OECD as possessing properties indicating a hazard for human health for systemic health effects, as supported by the toxicity information of tung oil.

The European Food Safety Authority concluded in 2010 that laboratory studies on the conjugated form of a major component of tung oil did not indicate a risk for genotoxicity, reproductive toxicity or carcinogenicity.

In the Multi-Chemical Tiered I Human Health Risk Assessments carried out by the Australian Government Department of Health in 2017, dimer acid was considered as not posing an unreasonable risk to human health.

On the basis of information from the above-noted international assessments, ALA; tung oil; tall oil fatty acid; tall oil fatty acids, potassium salts; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; and trimer acid were not identified as having systemic health effects of concern, and risk to human health is considered to be low.

General population exposure to undecylenic acid can occur from its use as a flavouring agent in certain foods, from cosmetics, as well as from natural health products. Exposure to ethylhexyl cocoate can occur from its use in cosmetics. The available health effects information on undecylenic acid and its sodium salt, as well as ethylhexyl cocoate and its hydrolyzed products, indicates effects on the body/organs weights and effects on the clinical chemistry parameters. The margins of exposure between estimated levels of exposure for both these substances and the critical effect levels in laboratory studies are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that undecylenic acid; ALA; tung oil; tall oil fatty acid; tall oil fatty acids, potassium salts; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; trimer acid and ethylhexyl cocoate do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that undecylenic acid; ALA; tung oil; tall oil fatty acid; tall oil fatty acids, potassium salts; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; trimer acid; and ethylhexyl cocoate do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of six substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas five of the six substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on Acid Black 2 pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on the remaining five substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the five substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on Acid Black 2 at this time.

Jonathan Wilkinson
Minister of the Environment

Patty Hajdu
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Pigments and Dyes Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 6 of 25 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Pigments and Dyes Group. These six substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. Nineteen of the 25 substances were determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports.footnote 5,footnote 6 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the six substances listed in the table below, hereinafter referred to as the Pigments and Dyes Group.

Substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group

CAS RN table a2 note a

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

596-03-2

Spiro[isobenzofuran-1(3H),9′-[9H]xanthen]-3-one, 4′,5′-dibromo-3′,6′-dihydroxy-

D&C Orange 5

1326-03-0

Xanthylium, 9-(2-carboxyphenyl)-3,6-bis(diethylamino)-, molybdatetungstatephosphate

Pigment Violet 1

8005-03-6 table a2 note b table a2 note c

C.I. Acid Black 2

Acid Black 2

12224-98-5

Xanthylium, 9-[2-(ethoxycarbonyl)phenyl] -3,6-bis(ethylamino)-2,7-dimethyl-, molybdatetungstatephosphate

Pigment Red 81

26694-69-9

Xanthylium, 9-[2-(ethoxycarbonyl)phenyl] -3,6-bis(ethylamino)-2,7-dimethyl-, ethyl sulfate

N.A.

42373-04-6

Thiazolium, 3-methyl-2-[(1-methyl-2-phenyl- 1H-indol-3-yl)azo]-, chloride

Basic Red 29

Abbreviation: N.A. = not available.

Table a2 note(s)

Table a2 note a

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Return to table a2 note a referrer

Table a2 note b

This CAS RN is a UVCB (substance of unknown or variable composition, complex reaction product, or biological material).

Return to table a2 note b referrer

Table a2 note c

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this screening assessment, as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.

Return to table a2 note c referrer

The substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group are used as colouring agents, spanning a variety of potential applications. Substances in this group are used in products available to consumers, including cosmetics (e.g. hair products, lipstick and lip balm, make-up, face paint, nail polish), food packaging materials, inks (e.g. printing inks, ink pads), textiles, and children’s arts and crafts materials (e.g. crayons, chalk). According to information submitted under section 71 of CEPA in the 2011 calendar year, no manufacturing was reported above the 100 kg threshold for the substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group. Reported import quantities were not above the 100 kg threshold for D&C Orange 5, were in the range of 1 000 kg to 10 000 kg for each of Pigment Violet 1 and Acid Black 2, were not above 100 kg for each of Pigment Red 81 and the substance bearing CAS RN 26694-69-9, and were in the range of 100 kg to 1 000 kg for Basic Red 29.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, the substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group are considered unlikely to be causing ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from D&C Orange 5, Pigment Violet 1, Acid Black 2, Pigment Red 81, the substance bearing CAS RN 26694-69-9, and Basic Red 29. It is concluded that D&C Orange 5, Pigment Violet 1, Acid Black 2, Pigment Red 81, the substance bearing CAS RN 26694-69-9, and Basic Red 29 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the general population of Canada, the predominant source of exposure to substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group is from use of products available to consumers that contain these substances. The predominant routes of exposure are oral and dermal. Potential dermal and oral exposures to D&C Orange 5 and Acid Black 2 were based on use of cosmetics. Potential exposures to Pigment Violet 1, Pigment Red 81, and the substance bearing CAS RN 26694-69-9 were derived for toddlers from the use of children’s arts and crafts materials. Potential dermal and oral exposures to Basic Red 29 were derived from contact with textiles. Potential inhalation exposure to Pigment Violet 1 from use of chalk was low relative to oral exposures. Inhalation exposure to the remaining substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group was not considered to be of concern given their very low volatility and their uses.

In laboratory studies, no treatment-related or consistent dose-dependent health effects were observed for D&C Orange 5. The critical health effects for Pigment Violet 1, based on its dye component Basic Violet 10, were an increase in the incidence of astrocytomas of the brain and/or spinal cord and increased mortality, organ weights and food consumption. No treatment-related or consistent dose-dependent health effects were observed in the key studies used for risk characterization for Acid Black 2 based on the structural analogue Solvent Black 5. Decreased body weight was the critical health effect for the substance bearing CAS RN 26694-69-9 as well as for Pigment Red 81, based on its dye component, Basic Red 1. A threshold of toxicological concern (TTC)-based approach was taken for Basic Red 29.

Margins of exposure comparing levels at which critical health effects occur (or in their absence, the highest tested dose in key studies) and the estimates of exposure from the use of products available to consumers were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for D&C Orange 5, Pigment Violet 1, Acid Black 2, Pigment Red 81 and the substance bearing CAS RN 26694-69-9. For Basic Red 29, the estimate for exposure from products available to consumers was lower than the TTC value based on its Cramer Class and overall negative genotoxicity, indicating a low probability of risk to human health. Basic Red 29 is considered to be a low concern for human health at current levels of exposure.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that D&C Orange 5, Pigment Violet 1, Acid Black 2, Pigment Red 81, the substance bearing CAS RN 26694-69-9, and Basic Red 29 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that the six substances in the Pigments and Dyes Group do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment of these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of two substances — ethanone, 1-[4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dinitrophenyl]- (musk ketone), CAS RNfootnote 1 81-14-1, and benzene, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitro- (musk xylene), CAS RN 81-15-2 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas musk ketone is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on musk xylene pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on musk ketone pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining substance at this time.

Notice is also given that options will be considered for follow-up activities to track changes in exposure to musk ketone and musk xylene.

Jonathan Wilkinson
Minister of the Environment

Patty Hajdu
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Nitro Musks Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two substances referred to collectively as the Nitro Musks Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and the common names and abbreviations of these substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Nitro Musks Group

CAS RN

DSL name

Common name (abbreviation)

81-14-1

Ethanone, 1-[4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dinitrophenyl]-

Musk ketone (MK)

81-15-2 table a3 note a

Benzene, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitro-

Musk xylene (MX)

Table a3 note(s)

Table a3 note a

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table a3 note a referrer

Musk ketone and musk xylene do not occur naturally in the environment. They are used primarily as fragrances or fragrance ingredients. In Canada, musk ketone is found in some cosmetics, and musk xylene is found in some air fresheners, personal care products and cleaning products. According to the responses to a CEPA section 71 survey conducted for the year 2008, musk ketone and musk xylene were both imported into Canada in quantities between 1 000 and 10 000 kg. In the same year, musk ketone and musk xylene were manufactured in quantities of less than 100 kg and of between 100 and 1 000 kg, respectively.

Musk ketone and musk xylene are principally released into wastewater after the use of products available to consumers and, therefore, can enter the environment through wastewater discharges to surface water. Releases to surface water via wastewater effluent could also occur as a result of the formulation of cleaning and personal care products or when wastewater is generated from industrial operations such as cleaning. Releases to soil can occur from land application of biosolids derived from wastewater treatment.

Musk ketone and musk xylene have low water solubility and are very persistent in the environment, with an overall persistence in the order of years. When released into water, their primary mode of entry to the environment, they will biodegrade and hydrolyze slowly. The presence of musk ketone and musk xylene metabolites in effluents from wastewater treatment systems indicates that biodegradation during wastewater treatment could be occurring. Musk ketone and musk xylene are persistent in air, but significant releases to that medium are not expected. Musk ketone and musk xylene have, respectively, moderate and high bioaccumulation potential in aquatic organisms.

Empirical and modelled data suggest that both musk ketone and musk xylene are hazardous to aquatic organisms at relatively low concentrations. The few soil studies available indicate that musk ketone is not hazardous to soil-dwelling organisms. No soil studies were available for musk xylene, but given the similarity of its structure and physical-chemical properties to those of musk ketone, it is assumed that its effects on soil-dwelling organisms are similar.

Several studies that examined concentrations of musk ketone and musk xylene in Canadian wastewater treatment systems reported low but measurable concentrations in influents, effluents and biosolids. On the basis of the uses and quantities of musk ketone and musk xylene reported for 2008, as well as their expected release pathways and fate, three environmental exposure scenarios were developed: industrial releases to wastewater by formulators who use them; down-the-drain releases from products that contain them and are available to consumers; and land application of biosolids that contain them. Risk quotients for the industrial release scenario, as well as quantitative risk analyses for the other two scenarios, indicate that levels of musk ketone and musk xylene in the environment are below levels of concern to aquatic and soil-dwelling organisms.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from musk ketone and musk xylene. It is concluded that musk ketone and musk xylene do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of potential effects on human health, decreased growth and food consumption and/or effects on the liver were observed in repeated dose laboratory studies conducted with musk ketone or musk xylene via the oral or dermal routes.

Both substances have been measured in environmental media in Canada. Estimates of exposure to Canadians were derived from levels of musk ketone and musk xylene in environmental media and in products used by consumers, such as cosmetics, air fresheners, and cleaning products. On the basis of a comparison of estimates of exposure to musk ketone and musk xylene with critical effect levels identified from laboratory studies, margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in health effects and exposure data used to characterize risk.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that musk ketone and musk xylene do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is therefore concluded that musk ketone and musk xylene do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the environment to musk ketone and musk xylene is not of concern at current levels, these substances are associated with ecological effects of concern. Therefore, there may be concern if exposure levels were to increase. Follow-up activities may include those to track changes in exposure or commercial use patterns.

The Government will use the data gathered through these follow-up activities to prioritize further information gathering or risk assessment of these substances, if required.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

CANADA–MADAGASCAR TAX CONVENTION ACT, 2018

Notice in respect of the entry into force of the Convention between Canada and the Republic of Madagascar for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income

Notice is given, pursuant to paragraph 6(a) of the CanadaMadagascar Tax Convention Act, 2018footnote 7, that the “Convention” as defined in section 2 of that Act, which was signed on November 24, 2016, entered into force on June 3, 2020.

July 20, 2020

The Honourable William Francis Morneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Finance

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

A supplier can file a claim for exemption under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (HMIRA) with Health Canada from having to disclose information under the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) and Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR) that they consider to be confidential business information (CBI) on a safety data sheet (SDS) or label associated with a hazardous product.

An employer can also file a claim for exemption under the HMIRA with Health Canada from having to disclose information under the Canada Labour Code or the provisions of the Accord Act that they consider to be CBI on an SDS or label associated with a hazardous product.

Notice is hereby given of the filing of claims for exemption under the HMIRA listed in the table below.

Lynn Berndt-Weis
Director
Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau
Consumer and Hazardous Products Safety Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Ingevity Corporation

INDULIN 206

C.i. of one ingredient

03375818

Ingevity Corporation

PERAL 417

C.i. of one ingredient

03375819

Ecolab Co.

ESTEEM DRY ALL

C.i. of one ingredient

03376010

Baker Hughes Canada Company

FORSA™ PAO3181A PARAFFIN INHIBITOR

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of one ingredient

03376408

Ingevity Corporation

PAVE BOND LITE

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

03376562

Stepan Company

STEPOSOL CITRI-MET

C.i. of two ingredients

03376579

Nalco Canada ULC

NALCO® 1221

C.i. of one ingredient

03376800

Evonik Canada Inc.

CAPLUS® 1202

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03377419

The Lubrizol Corporation

LANCO™ TF 1780 EFC

C.i. of one ingredient

03377618

Quadra Chemicals LTD.

POLYFLOAT™ 7150

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

03378123

Nalco Canada ULC

EC2727A

C.i. of one ingredient

03378994

Allnex Canada Inc., c/o Goodmans, LLP

ADDITOL® XW 6580 coating additives

C.i. of one ingredient

03379126

Shell Catalysts & Technologies

Cansolv absorbent DS

C.i. of three ingredients

03379481

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

  • Canadian Energy Regulator
    • Chief Executive Officer
      • De Silva, Gitane, Order in Council 2020-522
  • Health Canada
    • Federal Lead, COVID-19 Testing, Contact Tracing and Data Management Strategies
      • Linklater, Les, Order in Council 2020-529
  • Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Alberta
  • Supreme Court of British Columbia
    • Judge
      • Lyster, Lindsay M. Q.C., Order in Council 2020-527
  • Lakhani, Salma, Order in Council 2020-520

July 23, 2020

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

St. John’s Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the St. John’s Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule A of the letters patent sets out the navigable waters that are within the jurisdiction of the Authority and Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal real property and federal interest in real property managed by the Authority;

WHEREAS to reflect a transfer of administration between Transport Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the navigable waters and the federal real property described below (“the Property”) are required to be removed from Schedules A and B of the Authority’s letters patent;

WHEREAS the Authority, pursuant to subsection 44(5) of the Act, has informed the Minister that it is of the opinion that the Property is no longer required for port purposes;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent amending Schedules A and B of its letters patent to reflect these amendments;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendments to the letters patent are consistent with the Act,

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the Authority’s letters patent are amended as follows:

  • 1. Schedule A of the letters patent is amended by adding the following after the description of navigable waters:
    • SAVE AND EXCEPT:
      • Plan S-6439, Public Services and Procurement Canada
      • All that certain waterlot situated at St. John’s, Southside Road, District of St. John’s South, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, shown on Public Services and Procurement Canada Plan S-6439, dated May 3, 2018, as signed by Michael R. Duffett, Newfoundland Surveyor, being more particularly described as follows:
      • BEGINNING at a point situated on the Ordinary High Water Mark (2018) of the waters of St. John’s Harbour and on a western boundary of lands now or formerly of St. John’s Port Authority (Parcel 2018-2), as shown on the above-mentioned plan, said point having Newfoundland grid coordinate values of North 5 269 577.977 metres and Est 327 911.274 metres;
      • THENCE North 41 degrees 32 minutes 00 seconds West, a distance of 1.897 metres to a point;
      • THENCE North 28 degrees 47 minutes 28 seconds West, a distance of 32.000 metres to a point;
      • THENCE North 43 degrees 50 minutes 45 seconds East, a distance of 125.000 metres to a point;
      • THENCE North 90 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East, a distance of 128.345 metres to a point situated on an eastern boundary of lands now or formerly of H.M. in right of Canada (Parcel 9), said point also being South 64 degrees 18 minutes 42 seconds West, a distance of 209.833 metres from the center of Chain Rock Light;
      • THENCE along the said eastern boundary of lands now or formerly of H.M. in right of Canada (Parcel 9), South 64 degrees 18 minutes 42 seconds West, a distance of 59.995 metres to a point;
      • THENCE continuing along the said eastern boundary of lands now or formerly of H.M. in right of Canada (Parcel 9 and Parcel 7), South 39 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds West, a distance of 102.800 metres to a point situated on the aforesaid Ordinary High Water Mark (2018) of the waters of St. John’s Harbour;
      • THENCE following along the said Ordinary Water Mark (2018) of the waters of St. John’s Harbour in northwesterly, westerly, and southwesterly directions for a distance of 90 metres, more or less, to the Place of Beginning, said Place of Beginning being South 79 degrees 28 minutes 47 seconds West, a distance of 79.808 metres from the last said point.
      • THE above described waterlot containing an area of 1.0935 hectares, more or less.
      • ALL bearings are grid reference 53 degrees 00 minutes West Longitude - Central Meridian of MTM Zone 1, NAD83 metric values.
  • 2. Schedule B of the letters patent is amended by adding the following after the text of PART III:
    • PART IV
    • SAVE AND EXCEPT:
      • Parcel 2018-1, Plan S-6439, Public Services and Procurement Canada
      • All that certain lot, piece, or parcel of land covered by water, situated at St. John’s, Southside Road, District of St. John’s South, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, shown as Parcel 2018-1 on Public Services and Procurement Canada Plan S-6439, dated May 3, 2018, as signed by Michael R. Duffett, Newfoundland Surveyor, containing an area of 1.0935 ha, more or less.
      • Parcel 2018-2, Plan S-6439, Public Services and Procurement Canada
      • All that certain lot, piece, or parcel of land, situated at St. John’s, Southside Road, District of St. John’s South, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, shown as Parcel 2018-2 on Public Services and Procurement Canada Plan S-6439, dated May 3, 2018, as signed by Michael R. Duffett, Newfoundland Surveyor, containing an area of 1661.0 mfootnote 2, more or less.
  • 3. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the effective date of the Transfer and Acceptance of Administration of Federal Real Property between the Minister of Transport Canada and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

ISSUED this 29th day of June, 2020.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Trois-Rivières Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Trois-Rivières Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovables known and designated as being lot 1 019 107 and part of lot 6 292 198 of the cadastre of Quebec;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the said immovables in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot Number

Description

1 019 107

An immovable known and designated in the Land register of Quebec as being lot 1 019 107, containing an area of 726.5 mfootnote 2.

Part of lot
6 292 198

An immovable known and designated in the Land register of Quebec as being part of lot 6 292 198, containing an area of 2 991.7 mfootnote 2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the immovables to the Authority.

ISSUED this 15th day of July, 2020.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-010-20 — Release of ICES-001, Issue 5

Notice is hereby given that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) has published the following standard:

  • Interference-Causing Equipment Standard ICES-001, issue 5, Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) Equipment

This standard will come into force upon publication on the official publications section of the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

General information

The Interference-Causing Equipment Standards list will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Comments and suggestions for improving this standard may be submitted online using the Standard Change Request form.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of the document referred to herein are available electronically on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

August 1, 2020

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Member

Atlantic Pilotage Authority Canada

 

Director

Business Development Bank of Canada

 

Director — Board Risk Committee Chairperson

Business Development Bank of Canada

 

Chairperson

Canada Council for the Arts

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

 

Member (Federal)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

 

President

Canadian Commercial Corporation

 

Commissioner (full-time), Commissioner (part-time)

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Commissioner

Canadian Grain Commission

 

Commissioner

Canadian Grain Commission

 

Member

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

 

Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

 

Director

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

 

Permanent Member

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

 

Executive Director

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

 

President

Canadian Space Agency

 

Chairperson

Canadian Transportation Agency

 

Temporary Member

Canadian Transportation Agency

 

Chief Administrator

Courts Administration Service

 

President

Destination Canada

 

Director

Export Development Canada

 

Director

Farm Credit Canada

 

Chairperson

Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board

 

Vice-Chairperson

Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board

 

Chairperson

Great Lakes Pilotage Authority Canada

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton-Oshawa Port Authority

 

Assistant Deputy Chairperson

Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada

 

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Chairperson

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Director (Federal)

Nanaimo Port Authority

 

Secretary

National Battlefields Commission

 

Member

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Taxpayers’ Ombudsman

Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman

 

Member

Payments in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Chairperson

Polar Knowledge Canada

 

Member

Polar Knowledge Canada

 

President

Polar Knowledge Canada

 

Director

Public Sector Pension Investment Board

 

Member

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

 

President

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

 

Registrar

Supreme Court of Canada

 

Chairperson and Member

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

Member

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

Member

Transportation Safety Board of Canada